5cc Announces New Opening In The Heart Of The City

Singer-Tavern-Press-Photo-4 copy

5cc has announced the opening of its fifth venue, adding to its collection of original, specialist bars located behind London’s hidden doors. In the heart of East London, 5cc can be found tucked away in the area’s latest pub, Singer Tavern, also opening in March.  

Introducing a carefully crafted martini menu exclusive to this venue, 5cc Singer Tavern remains true to the collection’s philosophy; offering a variety of quality spirits and well-made drinks in a stylish but approachable environment. The new 5cc experience showcases the very best in London’s clandestine cocktail culture.

THE GRADE II LISTED HIDDEN DOOR

Concealed behind the façade of a Grade II listed East London pub; 5cc has created an individual cocktail bar in the heart of the city. In keeping with the collection’s concept, 5cc Singer Tavern finds inspiration in its location’s history. Built in 1929, the site was originally conceived to house the headquarters of the iconic Singer Sewing Machine Company.

Featuring bare brick walls, original tiles, intimate leather booths and a private space seating up to 10 covers, 5cc Singer Tavern showcases the best in East London design inspiration.

CLANDESTINE COCKTAILS

Mirroring 5cc’s dictum of putting a contemporary twist on a classic, the young and inspiring Group Bar Manager Charles Montanaro has created a bespoke cocktail menu for the venue alongside Bar Manager Andrei Marian. Carefully constructed to showcase the skill of the bartenders as well as the range of fine spirits available, the Singer Tavern menu offers an opportunity to discover new and varied ways to enjoy spirits.

For a true taste of Singer Tavern try the Knock Out: East London Liquor Company Demerara rum, lime, strawberry and black pepper cordial topped up with soda for a balanced cocktail with a kick. If it’s the exotic you’re looking for, look no further than the Loosie D’Ouro featuring Glen Moray Port Cask, P.F. Curacao, Tio Pepe sherry, vanilla, chocolate and chilli bitters served with a Paul A. Young chocolate truffle. Or discover an East London twist on a classic with the East End Old Fashioned: 10 Elijah Craig 12, lapsang souchong cordial, chilli and citrusy orange bitters.

MARTINI INNOVATION

The new 5cc Singer Tavern has a martini menu that boasts batch-produced gins from authentic distillers including the popular East London Liquor Company. From the House Martini to unconventional alternatives such as Saint & Sinner’s Dictador Colombian Aged gin, there is a martini for every palette.

5cc Singer Tavern has created a concise menu of small bites to compliment its cocktail list, including dishes such as smoked mackerel pate and lamb croquettes.

Located below Singer Tavern, 1 City Road EC1Y 1AG, the new 5cc cocktail bar will open from Monday- Saturday 5pm- late and from midday on Thursday and Fridays

For bookings, please email reservations@5cc-london.com.

The 86 Company

86 Company

Bartenders.

The lifeline of any country when the serving of drinks is concerned.

The connection between bottle and customer.

The guys and girls every brand needs to get on their side to really make a splash in the bar world.

Welcome then to The 86 Company.

The 86 Company was formed back in September 2012, launching four expressions that have been worked on closely by some of the worlds best distilleries and distillers available, all with feedback and inspiration from bartenders. So from here on, we’ll be taking a look at what company has come up with, and lets see if they’ll catch your eye too.

Aylesbury Duck Vodka

Aylesbury Duck is a Canadian vodka, made from soft white winter wheat sourced directly from local farmers in the Western Rockies close to Calgary. The distillers create their own mash from the winter wheat, which is then fermented for three days and results in an abv of between 9.5 and 11%. From here it will go to the beer holding tank and onto the beer still for distillation. The spirit will be continuously distilled in three separate copper plated column stills, with all three being built back in the 1940’s, and using Canadian glacial water. In the first still (The Beer Still) the spirit is distilled to 65% abv then moved to stills 2 and 3, or the rectifying stills. Here, it is distilled to a proof of 96.5% abv.

The distilled vodka is then shipped to a bottling facility in California where water from a well in Mendocino County is added by Domaine Charbay Distillers.

So how does it fare?

Aylesbury Duck - 40%

Clean on the nose with hints of the winter wheat, and a slight potato notes near the end. Slightly sweet on the palate, with the flavours of the wheat, baked caramel and a slight light citrus to experience.

A cracking spirit on its own, but how about one of these?

Duck Martini

Glass – 

Martini

Ingredients – 

5 Parts Aylesbury Duck Vodka
1/2 Part Dry Vermouth

Method – 

Stir over ice, pour into a Martini glass and garnish with a lemon peel

Caña Brava Rum

Caña Brava is named and made from sugar cane grown in the region of Herrera, Panama. The rum is produced in the Las Cabras Distillery, which was first erected in 1919 as a sugar mill until the mid-nineties when Francisco “Don Pancho” J Fernandez (a Master Distiller for 45 years) and Carlos Esquivel discovered the neglected warehouse and copper column still. It is here that they boil the harvested sugar cane juice to crystalize the sugars, which are then removed by centrifugal spinning, leaving behind the molasses. The molasses are then diluted and fermented with the aid of “Don Pancho’s” distinct natural pineapple yeast.

The fermented liquid is then distilled through five continuous stills to an abv of between 92-94%. The first 4 stills are copper plate whilst the last still is 100% copper and brass. Once distilled, it is cut to a proof of 75% abv and placed into new American oak barrels and aged for 18-24 months. After the time period, the spirit is cut to 49% abv and moved to used American whiskey barrels (a mixture of bourbon & Tennessee whiskey barrels) and aged for a further 12-24 months.

After ageing, the rums are blended with older rums for consistency, then tried and tested in Daiquiri’s and other famous mixed rum drinks to choose the final blend before being filtered three times – Carbon filtration, Millipore Cellulose filtration and cold filtration.

So how does it fare?

Caña Brava – 43%

Very light on the nose with a slight hint of vanilla, citrus and oak combining. Very smooth on the palate, with soft hints of toffee, oak and cocoa leading a lingering finish.

Of course, works well in a Daiquiri.

Daiquiri Classico (1898)

Glass – 

Coupette

Ingredients – 

60 ml Caña Brava
30 ml Fresh Lime Juice
15 ml Simple Syrup (2:1)

Method – 

Shake all the ingredients over ice and strain into a coupette. Garnish with a lime wheel.

Fords Gin

Fords Gin is distilled in London at Thames Distillers, and is the result of a partnership between 8th generation Master Distiller Charles Maxwell and Simon Ford of The 86 Co. Using a mix of 9 botanicals including juniper, coriander seed, bitter orange peel, lemon peel, grapefruit peel, jasmine flower, orris, angelica and cassia) that are steeped for 15 hours within a base spirit of neutral grain spirit made from English wheat. Two stills are used at Thames Distillers, Tom Thumb and Thumberlina in a distilling process that lasts 5 hours. The finished distilled spirit is shipped to San Francisco where it is cut with water from a well in Mendocino County.

So how does it fare?

Fords – 45%

Light on the nose with a slightly dry citrus note. Aromatic hits of the jasmine and juniper come through. A developing spice on the palate, slight oily texture with a good kick of rind from the grapefruit and orange on the lingering finish.

Great on its own, but how about one of these –

White Negroni

Glass – 

Rocks

Ingredients – 

50 ml Ford’s Gin
25 ml Suze or Gran Classico
30 ml Lavender infused Dolin Blacn Vermouth

Method – 

Stir ingredients over ice in a mixing glass. Strain over fresh ice within a rocks glass and garnish with a lemon wheel.

Tequila Cabeza

Tequila Cabeza is made from 100% estate owned agave that is grown in the Los Altos region of Arandas in Mexico and produced at the El Ranchito Distillery since 1994. The agave are grown by the Vivanco family, who have been cultivating agaves on their 800-hectare mountainside land for five generations, and hand-picked by the Jimadores at seven to nine years of age when the agave has a sugar content of 23-28%. Once harvested, the piñas are cooked in brick ovens for 24 hours at 100 °C and are then left to cool for 24 hours
before being fed manually into the shredder. Here, the agave juice is extracted and the fibres are separated. Natural spring water is added during the process too.

The resulting agave juice (mosto) is fermented with the aid of a Champagne yeast in cooper tanks during the winter months (the cooler temperature allows for an extended mash period (approximately 10 days). Once the fermentation is finished,
the mash sits for two days before distillation. Distillation occurs in two separate copper pot stills, the first being the destrozador still that produces the ordinario at 20-22% ABV, which is then filtered. The second distillation, in the rectificator still, produces tequila at 55-56% abv. There is no filtration after the second distillation, but distilled natural spring
water is added to bring it down to 43% abv. The spirit is then rested in stainless steel for 60 days before bottling.

But how does it fare?

Tequila Cabeza – 43%

Very smooth agave notes on the nose, with hints of coriander spice that follows onto the palate. A citrus and earthy combination blends well, with hints of black pepper but plenty of agave kicks on the long finish.

Way back at the beginning, I spoke about how bartenders have influenced the four expressions above. 4 spirits created for some of the worlds most famous cocktails, versatile in use and a bottle to match. But did you notice, each spirit has a different bottle finish? The neck, for example, has been designed to easily hold with a full hand, whilst there is a ridge in the middle of the bottle for bartenders with smaller hands and is weighted for the perfect pour! Now that’s looking after bartenders, and ultimately giving you a better experience too.

Of course, that shouldn’t stop you from enjoying these yourself at home, and they offer a difference to your usual classic cocktails. Grab some bottles for your drinks cabinet, or head to your local bar and see the bartenders in action with their favourite, bartender in mind, bottles of spirit.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Wenneker

Wenneker

Most of you will know that the Dutch are the creditors when gin is concerned. They were the fathers of Genever, which spun itself into the category we all know and love. It’s odd then that here in the UK, Dutch gin’s are relatively low on the ratio scale. Bols and Sylvius are just two of a handful that have made it over full-time so-to-speak, and today I wanted to feature another that is worthy of your time, Wenneker.

Wenneker takes itself back to 1693, February 16th to be exact, when Hendrick Steeman erected two brandy distilling-kettles. It’s these two pieces of equipment that found itself in the possession of Joannes Wenneker in 1812, but would leave the family tree when his great-grandson Franciscus Wenneker sold the company to a malter from Schiedam named Johannes Cornelis van der Tuijn due to the lack of successors. The Van der Tujin family still own Wenneker Distilleries today, and the fourth generation team is in place, although not at Schiedam. Instead, due to the lack of space for expansion in the original distillery, they moved to Roosendaal in 1967. Since then, they have acquired a number of famous Dutch distilleries including Piersma, Duys, Smeets and Distillery J.J Melchers Wz. Schiedam (with Olifant (Elephant) as their best known label).

The Wenneker name has always produced and created a range of Genevers and liqueurs, and still use the original recipe from the 17th century as a basis for the production. This feature though will focus on its newest line in its gin category, Wenneker Elderflower. Created using 6 distillates; Juniper berries, lime-tree blossom, lemon, orange, coriander and elderflower and produced in small batches of 1,200 bottles using pure water, Wenneker Elderflower was released in 2014.

But how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Wenneker Elderflower – 40%

Light elderflower notes on the nose, with subtle hints of citrus and dry root. Plenty of elderflower on the palate, with a long finish of light lime, and dry kicks of coriander.

A gin for a gin and tonic perhaps?

Wenneker and Tonic

Glass – 

Tumbler

Ingredients – 

25 ml Wenneker Elderflower
60 ml Schweppes Tonic Water

Method – 

Combine the gin and tonic over an ice filled tumbler glass and garnish with either a wedge of lime or lemon.

Although their main brands are Genever and liqueurs, their gin stands up very well for a good gin and tonic. It would be intriguing to see how different the Elderflower and the original dry gin expression are, so hopefully see that result very soon. In the meantime, grab a different gin and tonic this summer.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Imperial Collection

Imperial Collection

Vodka can be criminally underrated in this day and age. With so many countries now handing themselves the opportunity to fill the market with their own ‘unique’ creation, it’s hard to really stand out to the true and ultimately create a vodka worthy of quality.

Perhaps Imperial Collection can be one of them?

It’s alleged that in 1721, when Peter The Great was crowned Emperor of Russia, a one-of-a-kind vodka was created to celebrate, resulting in the Imperial Collection. Imperial Collection uses home-grown natural wheat that’s distilled and blended with water from Lake Ladoga, just below the Arctic Circle. There’s also a 12 stage filtration process, with a final ‘polish’ using golden membrane filters.

Four expressions are available overall, with three having the pleasure of being featured here –

Imperial Collection Golden Snow – 40%

Four times distilled with 24-carat gold decoration on the bottle and 23-carat gold leaf fakes within. Very clean on the nose, with a slight wheat aromas coming through. Very smooth upon the palate, with a slight spice kick creating a long, dry finish.

Imperial Collection Gold – 40%

Four times distilled. Clean, smooth with a soft wheat aroma and flavour creating a long finish.

Imperial Collection Czar’s Original - 40%

Four times distilled, eight times filtered and the official vodka of the 300th anniversary of Saint Petersburg in Russia. Soft wheat on the nose, with a rich, lively grain flavour on the palate that offers a lingering finish with a slight spice.

Great for sipping, but how about one of these?

The Royal Russian

Glass – 

Martini

Ingredients -

60 ml Imperial Collection Gold
30 ml Simple Syrup
15 ml Fresh Lemon Juice
3 Strawberries
Champagne

Method – 

Muddle the sugar and strawberries together in a shaker. Add the vodka and lemon juice and shake well over ice Strain into a Martini glass and top with Champagne.

Imperial Collection hits the premium mark on the head. The stylish bottles, the marketing of royalty, it all fits the model. The lack of detail in production does nod itself to a simple brand, but that doesn’t take away the fact that they use Russian wheat, fresh water and a hefty filtration process. Give it a go for something a little different in the vodka category.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Mezcal Vago

Mezcal Vaga

Mezcal is the next big thing for 2015. Here in Manchester, the category awareness has grown and specialist bars and restaurants have popped up to bring Mezcal to the public. One of the more interesting brands to hit the category here in the UK, is Mezcal Vago.

This specific Mezcal has been created by Aquilino García López and his family (Aquilino is the father-in-law of Mezcal Vago’s co-founder, Judah Kuper) for many a generation (the start date is lost in time) within the small village of Candeleria Yegolé on the border of Central Valley and Sierra Sur regions of Oaxaca in Mexico. Candeleria Yegolé is known to be an arid region of Oaxaca, making the conditions perfect for making Mezcal, especially with the close proximity of the confluence of two rivers.

Aquilino uses a traditional stone tahona to grind the cooked agave. a method that can take a couple of weeks if grinding a full oven of agave. Once ground down, the agave and its released juices are placed together into fermentation vats that are made of pine and can hold up to 1000 litres. The cooked agave and natural water ferment from the natural airborne yeasts in the air.

Now lets dive into each of the expressions, all created with hand care and attention –

Mezcal Vago Espadin - 51%

Twice distilled within copper pot stills using 100% Espadin agave and certified Joven (young) in age. Ripe on the nose with a slight smoke aroma coming through followed by light citrus. Ripe agave flavours upon the palate, with hints of anise and dry pine and a lingering caramel on the finish.

Mezcal Vago Elote – 52.1%

Twice distilled within copper pot stills using 100% Espadin agave, infused with Elote (toasted corn) and certified Joven in age. Plenty of expected corn on the nose alongside rich, sweet honey. A developing spice on the palate, dry, with plenty of corn green fruit and a good kick of smoke on the finish.

Mezcal Vago Ensamble en Barro – 50.3%

Crafted by Tio Rey in Sola De Vega. Twice distilled within Olla de Barro (clay) stills using 54% Espadin, 36% Coyote and 10% Cerrudo agave’s and certified Joven in age.
Soft pine needle aromas on the nose, with earthy notes present too. Full bodied with flavours of charred cinnamon and finishes with notes of pumpkin and chestnuts.

Mezcal Vago Mexicano - 49.4%

Twice distilled within copper pot stills using 90% Mexicano and 10% Espadin agave and certified Joven in age. Plenty of agave notes on the nose combined with light peach and dry spice. Notes of oak creating a slight smoky experience on the palate, with a lively spice, vanilla, caramel combination for the finish.

Some fantastic expressions here, and are perfect for sipping any day of the year. With a very local, hand produced feel to them, you expect to be surrounded by the hills of Oaxaca when drinking Mezcal Vago, but I’m sure with friends will be just as fine in your local bar, as currently there seems to be no UK stockist. I’ll keep you updated on this as this is most definitely a brand to experience.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Tamdhu

Tamdhu

Tamdhu. One of the oldest whisky names in Scotland, yet personally I don’t think It crosses many people minds when talking about whisky. It’s not for the lack of wanting to, I believe looking at it all, it’s quietly being the bedrock of Scottish spirits. Quite a bold statement I suppose, so I better back myself up with some hard evidence.

Spearheaded by a group of whisky blenders, including William Grant and Sons, Tamdhu came into the world at a time when Scotland was seen as the forerunner of the inventing age. The 17 and 1800’s saw the likes of the steam engine perfected by James Watt and the bicycle refined by Kirkpatrick MacMillan. It’s within these times (1897 to be exact) that Tamdhu rose on the banks of the River Spey within what was seen as the pinnacle of distilling. For example, using the experience of Speyside distillery architect Charles Doig of Elgin, the use of a water wheel positioned beneath the floor gave optimum performance and kilns designed to reduce heat loss.

Tamdhu came to be a part of the Edrington Group who, with William Grant in 1999, acquired the distillery from Highland Distillers who had owned the distillery since 1898, despite being closed in 1911, reopened in 1913, then mothballed in 1928 until 1948. In 2010 though, Ian Macleod Distillers took over the operation. Since then, there have been a selection of independent releases, but only one official.

The creation of Tamdhu involves the use of its own malt created from barley (one of only a handful of distilleries still with its on site malting floor, and from 1950, a Saladin box), distilled twice within the six stills they use, then combined with water originating from the Tamdhu spring before maturing within sherry casks.

So how does Tamdhu fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Tamdhu 10yr – 40%

Light cereal with fruit and gentle spice present on the nose. Rich red fruit on the palate, creating a lingering toffee flavour that results in a slightly dry smoky finish.

A great dram to enjoy any time of the year, and despite the opening and closing issues at the beginning of the century, Yes it doesn’t shout about itself like some of the others, but surely the liquid should do the shouting first? Give it a go, place it in your drinks cabinet and offer your friends a different take on Speyside.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Forest

Forest

As some of you may know, I love supporting local produce. I exhibit at local festivals, experience local produce, and feature local brands who have entered the market. One such name that I have come across lately is Forest gin. A Macclesfield born spirit by Karl and Lindsay Bond, who undertook this as more a hobby than anything else, has now turned heads with the likes of Harvey Nichols and a variety of Manchester bars, potentially seeing the full-time jobs switching to ‘gin producers’.

But why the hype? Lets take a look.

A 30 litre pot still is all it takes to create one batch of Forest gin, using botanicals from Macclesfield Forest. Sounds easy doesn’t it, but to Karl and Lindsay, trial and error with smaller versions of the pot stills were needed, all whilst their daughter, 7-year-old Harriet, combs the forest for fresh botanicals. The likes of wild bilberries, wild gorse flowers, wild raspberries and local moss are blended with several other fragrant botanicals, within an organic grain spirit that has already been steeped with juniper berries and coriander seeds, both of which are organically certified too.

The hand-craft feel comes into play with the botanicals, as a pestle and mortar are used to break up the various ingredients. Once all combined though, the spirit is distilled through the copper condenser, then brought down to 42% abv using pure local spring water. Bottled in a stoneware vessel, with a printed forest stencil upon (created by Papercut artist Suzy Taylor), Forest gin offers, like Blackwood’s, different batches depending on the seasons in Macclesfield Forest. Currently, batch three is on sale, with batch four on its way. That doesn’t mean the consistency will change too much, but really backs up the sourcing of the botanicals within the forest.

Question is though, how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Forest – 42%

Incredible amount of bold, floral aromas on the nose including raspberry, gooseberry, slight citrus and soft grass and oak notes. A good kick of forest floor with a warming spice developing on the palate. Aromatic, fresh hints of wild berries, nettle and lavender come through too. Long, slightly dry, with a soft and subtle green berry finish.

A cracking spirit to enjoy on its own or over ice. Currently there are no signature serves, but I can imagine a Dry Martini would work wonders with the flavours. As mentioned above, Forest gin has turned heads at one of the UK’s premium department stores in Harvey Nichols, the exclusive stockist to Forest gin for the time being. Grab yourself a bottle though, this is a brand that’s offering the gin world something a little bit different.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Iceberg

Iceberg

What is the purest vodka available in the world? Grey Goose? Belvedere? Crystal Head? Imagine my surprise when Iceberg came to me and mentioned that they are number one, due to the low mineral content of the iceberg water that they harvest in Canada. Always intrigued to find out more, I’ve had a look at their claim and to see what they are up to for the year ahead.

Iceberg has been available in the UK since 2010, and prides itself on being the only company to obtain a licence from the Newfoundland and Labrador government to harvest 12,000 year-old icebergs (naturally detached from Canadian Arctic glaciers) in the North Atlantic ocean, a process that takes 3 months at a time. Ontario sweet corn is used as the base grain, harvested and distilled four times within column stills. From here, it is taken to Newfoundland at 96.7% abv.

The alcohol is run through a basic charcoal pad filter to remove any contamination, then 30,000 litres of Iceberg water is added once it has been pre-filtered from 15 microns to 5 microns before blending. The slow blending of the water with the corn takes 3 days and is filtered overall 7 times. The end product produces a vodka that is free from manmade contaminates and one that is said to be the ‘most naturally pure vodka in the world’.

So how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Iceberg – 40%

Very clean on the nose, with soft hints of the sweet Ontario corn offering a smooth butter aroma. Smooth upon the palate, although a developing sweetness of butter and sea salt comes through to leave a bold, very long and a rather clean finish.

An interesting premium vodka, one that definitely took my by surprise on the first take. Although no signature serves seem to be offered by the brand, I can imagine it would give a great offering for a wet styled vodka Martini. Grab a bottle for a unique vodka experience today

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

WhistlePig

WhistlePig

The UK has a new whiskey from the US, and it’s landed with fanfare in many of the influential icons of the drinks world laps as the bar trade is scrambling for a piece of what is known as WhistlePig. The oddly named is a straight rye whiskey, and is heralded as one of the best rye’s in the world today. But how did it earn such a moniker? Lets take a look.

Born in 2007, WhistlePig started its life when Raj P. Bhakta bought WhistlePig farm, containing 500 plus acres in Shoreham, Vermont. He joined forces with ex Makers Mark Master Distiller Dave Pickerell and set about finding the best batch of rye available in North America within a 5 year plan to bring rye back into the USA. The first day of 2010 saw Raj and his family clear out an old barn, and in 2013 they harvested their first crop of rye. WhistlePig prides itself as being the first ever ‘single malt, one-stop rye shop’, with all the stages of the whiskey process happening on site. Finally, in 2015, the single-estate farm distillery is open, with the first run of distillation scheduled for July 4th 2015.

So how is WhistlePig fairing within the first few years?

Until July, the WhistlePig has been distilled in western Canada, but once the summer rolls around and the whiskey flows from the WhistlePig farm, the whiskey will be matured within a warehouse located just a few feet away. It’s here that the spirit is within new American charred oak barrels (or early use bourbon barrels) for at least 10 years, braving the open warehouse elements.

So how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

WhistlePig 10yr – 50%

Aged for 8 years in new American oak, then early use bourbon barrels for 2 years. Good depth on the nose, lots of aromas with soft spice and fruit. Subtle oak aromas combine well. Spice on the palate with a high, lively sweet and floral flavour, mixing well with the rye to create a very long, warm finish with a creamy texture.

A great spirit, which has caught the bartenders eyes a little –

World’s Greatest Rye Perfect Manhattan
World’s Greatest Rye Perfect Manhattan

World’s Greatest Rye Perfect Manhattan *

Glass – 

Martini

Ingredients -

60 ml Whistlepig straight rye whiskey
15 ml Sweet vermouth
15 ml Dry vermouth
3 dashes Angostura bitters
Lemon peel, for garnish

Method – 

Combine all liquid ingredients into an ice-filled mixing glass and stir briskly for about 15 to 20 seconds. Strain into chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with lemon peel after running the inside of the peel around the lip of the glass.

There are one or two other expressions that you may see popping up soon, including TripleOne, aged for 11 years and at 111 proof (55.5% abv) and Boss Hog 2014, selected from among the oldest barrels from Bond 77, which entered wood on April 5, 2001. Something different and exciting for your drinks cabinet, and despite the price, worthy of a cocktail or two as well. Enjoy.

* Recipe from The Five O’Clock Cocktail Blog

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

‘Bottle Your Own’ Whiskey Facilities Launch At Jameson Visitor Centres

Brian Nation

Brian Nation, Master Distiller at The Midleton Distillery, marked the launch of new Jameson Bottle Your Own facilities at the Old Jameson Distillery, Dublin, by hand-filling a 70cl bottle of a new and rare Jameson Irish Whiskey.

The new initiative, which is also launching at the Jameson Experience Midleton in Cork, invites whiskey fans to personally fill a bottle of Jameson Select Reserve Cask Strength Black Barrel from a live bourbon cask. Visitors can then personalise the label by hand with their name, the date and the whiskey’s cask number and ABV, before logging their personal details in a Bottle Your Own ledger, becoming a part of the Jameson legend.

The newest member of the Jameson family, Select Reserve Black Barrel is a blend of rich, Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey and a rare small batch grain whiskey, which is triple distilled in small quantities just once per year. The expression is available at its natural cask strength for the first time and exclusively through the Bottle Your Own facilities at the Old Jameson Distillery, Dublin, and the Jameson Experience Midleton in Cork at the cost of €100 per 70cl.

Freelance Events Curator/Collaborator, Brand Development, Drink Journalist, Taster & Guide to the World of Drinks

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