El Gato Negro Turn A Blind Eye With Prohibition Event

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El Gato Negro is to step back in time with an exclusive evening of social (and secret) drinking pleasure to toast Repeal Day on December 5. The day when Prohibition – a ban on the manufacture and sale of alcohol – came to an end in 1933.

Food and wine aficionados are invited to take part in the clandestine event, which will be held in the acclaimed Black Cat – the upstairs bar at the top of the heritage building with Manchester’s only retractable roof. Treasures sourced from local antique dealers, add character and vintage glamour – a perfect Prohibition hideaway.

Guests can shake their tail feathers behind blacked out windows to live swing band The Prohibition Swing Club or sit back and take in the speakeasy flavour with specially created cocktails. The exclusive cocktail menu will include the Bee’s Knees, a delicious blend of Tito’s Handmade Vodka, wild blossom honey and orange blossom, the White Water Rickey, a chilled mix of Buffalo Trace Bourbon and homemade strawberry iced tea soda and the Branca Brew, a dark blend of Fernet-Branca, fig liqueur and dry lager.

Though the full recipe is a secret, Fernet is made from a number of herbs and spices. It was handily classified as ‘medicinal’ during the Prohibition era, cementing its popularity in San Francisco and elsewhere. Do like the San Franciscans do this Repeal Day and give your merrymaking a healthy makeover.

The intimate event at the Black Cat starts at 1900. No booking is required, but access is recommended via the backdoors on South King Street in order to elude prying eyes. Discounts will be offered to those who have secured the secret passcode or to those in 1920’s glad rags.

Divide Opinions This Winter With A Limited Edition Laphroaig Festive Jumper

christmas-jumper-mid-resTis the season for giving and sharing…opinions. Get into the spirit with a limited edition Laphroaig ® festive jumper. Whether it’s a gift for a loved one or a treat for yourself, this fun jumper is the ideal way to spark conversation around the dinner table this holiday season. Available from the Laphroaig ® online shop, wear it with pride and express your opinion on this divisive single malt, however wild or wonderful.

A SPECIAL SEASONAL RELEASE

Last year’s Laphroaig® festive jumpers sold out in just 24 hours and with only 1,000 limited edition jumpers available this winter, get your hands on one now before its too late! Embroidered with a seasonal Fair Isle pattern and the Laphroaig® #OpinionsWelcome™ slogan, this festive jumper is ideal for whisky enthusiasts who have an opinion and are not afraid to wear it.

LOVE IT OR HATE IT

Whether you love the medicinal flavours of Laphroaig® or hate its smoky scent, it cannot be denied that Laphroaig® divides opinion. #OpinionsWelcome™ celebrates the hugely varied descriptions of Laphroaig® and this unique festive jumper champions them, urging lovers (and haters) to profess their feelings for the whisky this winter.

The unisex Laphroaig® festive jumper is available in size S, M, L and XL. To get yours now, visit http://www.laphroaig.com/shop.
£30.00, AVAILABLE NOW FROM WWW.LAPHROAIG.COM/SHOP FOR DECEMBER DELIVERY

The BEAT Society Takes Refuge In Manchester

 

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The Pernod Ricard BEAT Society rolled into Manchester this week with its 6 strong team of some of the UK’s influential and engaging industry figures taking over the new Refuge bar and restaurant in the city centre.

Concentrating on seven categories, the likes of Phil Huckle (UK Brand Ambassador Chivas Regal), Liam Sparks (Irish Whiskey Ambassador), Megs Miller (UK House of Tequila Ambassador), Matthias Lataille (UK Brand Ambassador Martell), Michael Foster (UK Brand Ambassador Havana Club) and special guest Jake O’Brien Murphy of Callooh Callay in London showed off their respective brand and category, but with a twist that offered an insight ‘outside the box’.

With only two more cities out of the initial seven to visit, I thought I’d offer an insight into what you can expect for the day as the BEAT team head to Newcastle (31/01/2017) and Liverpool (28/02/2017).

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Prepare to demystify the style of Irish Whiskey and the impact that Jameson and Midleton Distillery have created within the whiskey market as Liam Sparks talks through the process of creation. From both column and pot distillation, to the wood styles within ageing, Liam engages with his knowledge and stories over a couple of drams, including distillates from the column and pot stills, as well as the likes of Redbreast 12yr and Jameson Caskmates.

Following the Irish closely are the Scots, championed by Phil Huckle with his focus on the luxury blend of Chivas Regal. Promoting towards the history of the whisky cocktails and how Chivas Regal have been at the forefront of some of the most iconic classics, experience the styles and profiles of such forgotten gems as the Morning Glory Fizz, as well as last years Chivas Masters winning drink by Chelsey Bailey. You can also hear how you can enter the 2017 edition of the Chivas Masters, as well as experience The Huckster!

Heading to the grape side of the spirit categories, Matthias Lataille shows his insight into Martell by bringing it to the forefront of your mind when modifying your cocktail creations. Sample classic cognac drinks such as the Sidecar using the VSOP expression, as well as twists on staples including the Pierre Collins as Matthias shows his creativity and knowledge on cognac and tips of how to invite your customers to experience.

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Special guest star Jake O’Brien Murphy of Callooh Callay in London is on hand for the tour to offer an honest insight into the world of cocktail competitions, using his own experiences of entering competitions, including Jameson and Havana Club, in his career that includes positions within famed bars in Liverpool such as 81LTD. The do’s and dont’s of performance etiquette, how to approach those all important judges, understanding the brief set out, and adapting yourself to the live situation with confidence, Jake goes through the motions of before, during and after as you set out to highlight yourself to your peers and industry figures.

Demystifying tequila is Megs Miller, one of the latest additions to the BEAT Society family, as she focuses on Olmeca and how agave is riding the trend of the bartenders inquisitive. Serving up samples of Blanco, Reposado and Anejo, she’ll guide you through the tequila process, how Olmeca has grown over the years to accommodate changing tastes and attitudes towards the category, as well as her own agave experiences and stories when visiting Mexico and teaching across the world.

You can listen to Michael Foster’s stories too as he talks about Havana Club, with an emphasis on Cuba itself. Diving into how Havana Club has impacted the island in regards to cocktails such as the Mojito, Cuba Libra, Daiquiri and El Presidente, the enjoyment of the traditional recipes of such too, plus an understanding of how these classics have been devised through the stalwart bar scene within Cuba itself.

Mr Jake O’Brien Murphy also talks candidly on the vodka category, with the focus on Absolut and twisting the pre-conception that vodka is a ‘dying category’. He talks about the iconic Pornstar Martini and Cosmopolitan whilst giving his own views on how vodka can be best utilised in any bar through some simple changes.

Of course, no day of learning would be complete without a tipple of Mumm Champagne, with Matthias Lataille guiding you through the brand as you finish off the BEAT Society experience.

If you’re anything like me, having the opportunity to listen to one iconic figure in the industry is amazing, but to have seven in one room, offering their slant on their chosen category, is beyond an experience. Get yourselves signed up to Newcastle and Liverpool, immerse within the BEAT and take it all in.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Four Pillars Gin Appoints Love Drinks As Its Exclusive UK Distributor

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Four Pillars Gin, the Yarra Valley-based Australian distillery, is delighted to announce the appointment of Love Drinks as its exclusive UK-based importer and distributor.

Four Pillars has been distributed by Liberty Wines since May 2015 and co-founder Stuart Gregor thanked Liberty for its efforts in establishing a strong foothold for the brand in Great Britain and Ireland.

“We have had a terrific start to our sales life in the UK thanks to David Gleave and his team at Liberty and we want to thank them for all their efforts,” Gregor said.

“The time has come for us to work closely with a group like Love Drinks that is single-minded in its focus on great spirits, great relationships and growing high quality craft brands so we are delighted that we’ve been able to come to an agreement with Kirsty and her team.

“We love their portfolio and we’ve been keeping a close eye on the success of our Aussie mate Mr Black and we hope we can really turn up the volume on our sales over the next few years.”

Speaking about working with Four Pillars Gin and distributing throughout the UK, Kirsty Loveday, CEO and Founder of Love Drinks said;

“When starting Love Drinks almost ten years ago, I wanted to work with brands that were credible, innovative, award-winning and authentic – oh, and they had to taste good too! Four Pillars has all of these elements in spades.

As we all know, gin is an extremely crowded market, but at Love Drinks we are working with gins that have USPs that cut through the chatter of other gins; gins that have got a long-term plan and are investing in the UK market.

Four Pillars Gin complements the fantastic heritage and classic Britishness of Hayman’s Gins with their new world innovation and Modern Australian attitude.

For starters they have this uncanny knack of creating simply world class gins; their Rare Dry and Navy Strength have won more gold medals combined than the Aussies did in Rio and the distillery continues to deliver serious new gins with a twist – their Bloody Shiraz Gin, a typically Australian riff on Sloe and the new Spiced Negroni Gin both show what they can do when let loose…

Their whole ethos, from the gins they make, to their host of activities at their distillery in Yarra Valley just makes me smile; they make marmalade from the oranges that go into the botanical basket and feed their own litter of rare breed pigs on the spent botanicals for goodness sake! We know that there will be a real appetite for Four Pillars Gin and we’re looking forward to working with the team.”

Four Pillars burst onto the global gin scene in early 2014 when its Rare Dry Gin collected the first of its two Double Gold medals at the World Spirits Competition in San Francisco. The Rare Dry gin (41.8% ABV) is the cornerstone of its expanding portfolio of unique and at times idiosyncratic gins.

The Rare Dry is a modern New World style of gin – plenty of juniper supported by some indigenous Australian botanicals including lemon myrtle and Tasmanian pepper berries as well as the addition of whole fresh oranges in the Carl-still botanical basket.
Sitting alongside the Rare Dry gin in the Four Pillars portfolio will be the Navy Strength – an explosive gin coming in at 58.8% ABV with native finger limes, turmeric and ginger added in the botanical basket.

The Navy Strength has finished top of the World Gin Masters Navy Strength class in both 2015 and 2016 and has won multiple accolades in the UK and around the world.

Also becoming available in the UK for the first time will be the Four Pillars Spiced Negroni Gin (43.8% ABV) – a hugely spicy gin that has been augmented with the addition of African, Indonesian and Chinese peppers and spices to be a gin specifically made to stand up and be noticed in that king of drinks, the Negroni.

Four Pillars also has something of a phenomenon on its hands with an Aussie riff on a Sloe Gin; a sweet, purple elixir that they call Bloody Shiraz Gin. Steeped for eight weeks with freshly picked shiraz grapes, this near full strength gin (37.8% abv) is sweet and luscious and unlike anything on the world gin market. In Australia, the entire production sold out in two months and some small quantities are arriving in the UK this November, with most already pre-sold.

Four Pillars will be joining the Love Drinks portfolio from December 1, 2016.

Rhum J.M.

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The island of Martinique heralds some of the most well-known agricole brands available, including Rhum Clément, but it’s the partner in Rhum J.M. that this article will be focusing on, as we dive into this northern based rhum.

The journey begins in the late 17th century where the famous Pére Labat, the Jesuit priest credited with proliferating sugar cultivation in the French West Indies, was the parish priest of Macouba while he operated a sugar refinery at his house on the Roche River. Antoine Leroux-Préville purchased Father Labat’s estate in 1790 and gave the plantation the name it goes by today, Habitation Fonds-Préville.

In 1845, Antoine Leroux-Préville’s daughters sold the property to Jean-Marie Martin, a merchant from Saint-Pierre and husband of Marie Ferment who was the daughter of one of the island’s most famous sugar planters of the day. Jean-Marie Martin recognized the quality of the sugarcane he found on the Fonds-Préville estate and decided to shift the cultivation practices away from producing huge quanities of sugar and to focus on growing sugarcane. He built a small distillery on the estate and branded his initials “J.M.” on the first oak barrels used to mature his rum. Since then, these two letters have become and remain the emblem of the brand.

In 1914, Gustave Crassous de Médeuil, already owner of the Maison Bellevue, purchased Habitation Fonds-Préville from his brother Ernest. From this day, Maison Bellevue and Fonds-Préville became one entity. Located at the foot of the volcano Mont Pelèe, north of the island, Habitation Fonds-Préville remains to this day a family farming property, belonging to the heirs of the Crassous de Médeuil.

The sugarcane itself is 100% cultivated on the volcanic slopes of Habitation Bellevue, down from Mont Pelée. Once harvested and selected, the sugar cane is pressed to obtain the sugarcane juice. It is then distilled within column stills, in which the resulting liquid is bottled with volcanic mineral water to become the Rhum J.M Blanc expression. Parts of this run of rhum though will be placed in oak barrels to age in the cellars neighboring the distillery. The rhums begin to age in “rhum charred” American oak barrels.

So how does Rhum J.M. fare? Well below, I give to you my experiences so far –

Rhum J.M. XO – 45%

Aged 100% in re-charred Bourbon barrels. Light, subtle notes of oak on the nose, followed by toasted nuts. A sharp kick of sugar cane mellows into a bright voice of orange and cocoa, cinnamon and nutmeg on the palate. A long finish includes dashes of white pepper.

An exquisite tot of rhum to enjoy neat. Simple. Although I’ve only experienced the XO, if you’re looking for a sipping style, this should have a place in your drinks cabinet for sure, especially if you’re a whisky drinker looking to make the jump to rhum.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Rhum Clément

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Agricole is becoming more and more frequent within bars across the UK as bartenders are starting to embrace its sugar cane juice qualities. There are numerous brands leading the way, including Rhum Clément of Martinique, part of the French Caribbean Islands that also includes the likes of Guadeloupe and Saint-Barthélemy.

It’s Rhum Clément I’ll be focusing on here, looking back from the late 1800’s to the modern-day.

1887 is where we start with the purchase of the prestigious 43 hectare sugar plantation, Domaine de L’Acajou by a gentleman named Homère Clément, a physician and mayor of Le François. It’s here he pioneered Rhum Agricole. In 1917, Homère Clément created a distillery to fulfill the large request of alcohol during the first World War, using the fresh free-run sugarcane juice available to him.

After the death of Homère Clément in 1923, his son Charles Clément took over the business. He is credited with perfecting his family’s Rhum Agricole method and honed his craft while studying distillation at the famous Louis Pasteur School in France. It was Charles Clément who first bottled Rhum Agricole in Martinique and branded it after his father. Charles Clément was also the first to export bottles of Martinique Rhum Agricole and developed France as the first great market for Rhum Agricole outside of the Caribbean.

In 1973, Charles Clément  passed away, succeeded by his son, Georges-Louis, who was in charge of production and his two brothers Jean-José and Marcel-André, who increased the visibility of Rhum Clément throughout the Caribbean, Europe, Central and South America, and North America.

Once 1986 rolled around, Rhum Clément was sold to the Hayot family, who remained close to the Clément family in order to keep what was now one of Martinique’s great cultural assets, Habitation Clément, in Martinique hands. The Hayot family continue to this day to maintain the heritage, culture and passion of the Clément family and Rhum Clément.

In 1996, the agricultural rum of Martinique gains the Denomination of Controlled Origin (AOC), alongside the Creole home, the terrace and the dependences all classified as Listed buildings by the Ministry of Culture, a testament of Habitation Clément that had been re-vitalized previously with investment in new cellars for aging rhum, a reception for tourists, art galleries and tasting room for visitors.

So steeped into the Martinique history, but how does it all fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes on my experiences so far –

Rhum Clément Canne Bleue – 50%

The first mono-varietal rum in the world, resulting from the juice of one single variety of sugar cane called ‘canne bleue’.
A sweet grass note on the nose, with soft earth and subtle cane juice coming through. A good hit of the fresh-cut grass on the palate, with the natural sugars imparting nicely and its builds to a fresh, thin yet bold finish.

Rhum Clément Select Barrel – 40%

Crafted with a unique blend of rhums matured in selected oak barrels with a particularly heavy toasting selected by their cellar master.
Subtle dry oak upon the nose, with hints of orange rind and cocoa nip following. A smooth profile on the palate, with a fresher note of the orange and cocoa hitting. Subtle fresh sugar cane creeps in on the lingering finish.

Amazing tots to enjoy on their own, even the 50% stylings of the Canne Bleue is easy to sip. Of course, for a simple mix, the traditional signature serve is always a good shout –

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Ti’Punch by Clément

Glass – 

Rocks

Ingredients – 

60 ml Rhum Clément Canne Bleue
30 ml Sugar Syrup
1 wedge of Lime

Method –

Stir all ingredients over ice, squeezing in the lime wedge. Serve.

A fantastic example of Martinique rhum agricole, one that seems to offer a wide range of versatility, whether enjoyed straight, over ice or within a simple served cocktail, a bottle or two would not look out-of-place within your drinks cabinet.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Estancia

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Estancia is one of a handful of brands leading the way in the teachings of Raicilla, one of the many branches from Mezcal. When talking Mezcal, it encompasses such subcategories as Tequila, Sotol and Bacanora. Raicilla is also within these, seen as the softer, less smoky variation, closer to the Mezcal style, than that of Sotol which offers more grassy, smoky and earthy flavours.

It’s with this that Raicilla stands out as consumers branch out in their agave experiences, and Estancia is their to offer their take.

In 2014, Rio Chenery left New York City for the highlands of Jalisco in Mexico, and after reuniting with longtime friend Jonas Brewer, they set to building their own distillery. Settled within the town of La Estancia, they recruited Master Distiller Juan Ramosand the journey began.

To create Estancia, the distillation process begins by roasting their agave piñas (agave maximiliana ripened for 10 to 15 years) for 2 days within an adobe oven, resulting in the activation of the natural sugars within. The agave piñas are then crushed before being placed in open oak barrels to naturally ferment using wild yeast. Once ready, the resulting liquid (wort) is double distilled within copper alembic stills.

But how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Estancia – 40%

Fresh agave notes upon the nose, with a thin scent of earth and citrus coming through. Slightly sweetened earth notes on the palate, with the agave profile creeping in, followed by juicy pineapple and plum that lingers to the finish.

A great spirit to enjoy on its own, nut equally as good within this adapted cocktail by Wine Mag

raisilla-the-prietoniThe Prietoni

Glass – 

Coupette

Ingredients – 

50 ml Estancia Raicilla
30 ml Campari
30 ml Sweet vermouth
Strip of orange peel, for garnish

Method – 

In a mixing glass, combine all liquid ingredients with ice. Stir well, and strain into a chilled coupe glass. Garnish with orange peel.

There’s a new category hitting the shores of the UK, and it’s versatile, which means that it’s worthy of showing off to your friends and family, especially when the bottles looks pretty cool within your drink cabinet!

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

By The Dutch

by-the-dutch_old-genever-bottleshot“By the Dutch” are a relatively new company (founded in 2015) who produce traditional Dutch spirits, focusing on their native heritage. Majority are distilled in Schiedam, Holland, the claimed ‘Genever Town’ which also houses De Kuyper, Boompjes and Ketel One amongst its tenants.

With this, By The Dutch have created and released two spirits so far; Batavia Arrack and Old Genever. Coupled alongside their small range of bitters (classic, orange and ginger), the outlook is bright as they, to the UK vision at least, offer up categories slightly unfamiliar to the bartending world.

From my own By The Dutch experiences, Old Genever is a focus at the moment for me. Made by Branderij ‘De Tweelingh’ according to an old recipe dated back to 1942, the team use a high maltwine content made from rye, corn and malted barley. This is then triple distilled within copper pot stills before then being infused with juniper berry distillates.

Botanicals are also blended, including hops, cloves, anise, coriander, licorice, ginger, citrus and many others, then being brought down to 38% alcohol.

But how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

By The Dutch, Old Genever – 38%

Bold notes of corn on the nose, with grape must and subtle juniper notes. Smooth flavours on the palate, with waves of juniper present. Soft orange and earthy notes come though, followed by dry cocoa that leads to a lingering finish.

How to drink? Neat, over ice. Simple, effective, and well worth a place in your drinks cabinet, even if it’s for the traditional label look of the bottle itself. And it’s award-winning, claiming gold within both the Los Angeles International Spirits Competition 2016
and Global Gin Masters 2016!

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Ungava

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Canada is perhaps not your first choice of country when talking gin. Europe yes, even Oceania and Asia perhaps, but from the UK’s standpoint, whiskey is the tipple most associated with Canada in the likes of Canadian Club and Crown Royal. It’s to a vibrant introduction to my gin experiences then that Ungava comes along, hailing from the northeastern part of the country.

The Ungava name comes from the Ungava Peninsula, which can be found at the northern tip of Quebec within Canada. Ungava is proud to state that its six rare botanicals, native to the Arctic region, form the basis of the gin. These include Nordic Juniper, Arctic Blend, Cloudberry, Crowberry, Labrador Tea and Wild Rose Hips, each handpicked in the wild during the fleeting summer season. Due to the botanicals used, the yellow colour of the gin is completely natural, the result of the plants and berries of the tundra releasing their aromas and colours.

It’s with intrigue then that below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Ungava – 43.1%

Very light and subtle upon the nose, with honeysuckle and soft rose appearing. A developing boldness on the palate, with green berry and fresh herbal notes dominating. A fresh, striking finish.

A good gin to sip over ice, but this signature serve offers a great use for Ungava –

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Ungava Beach

Glass – 

Old Fashioned

Ingredients –

45 ml Ungava gin
60 ml Coconut water
45 ml Soda
15 ml Simple syrup
1 Grapefruit wedge and 1 grapefruit slice

Method –

Squeeze the grapefruit wedge into an old-fashioned glass. Add ice cubes and then the gin, simple syrup and coconut water. Finish with the soda and garnish with the grapefruit slice.

Canada sure know how to create a spirit, whether whisky or gin! An interesting brand look, but backs itself up with the flavour as Ungava should be reserved a place in your drinks cabinet for sure. Great to mix with too if you’re inviting friends and family round to impress.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Half Hitch

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Camden Lock has its part in the history of gin, seen in the mid-18oo’s as one of the significant areas in London to create, bottle and export gin. Around 20 acres were owned by the likes of W&A Gilbey Ltd, utilising the waterways and trains to ferry their cargo across the UK and beyond. Over time though, the locks were abandoned and fell into disrepair, until Mark Holdsworth stumbled upon the history, gaining his inspiration into creating a gin that would tip the hat to the forgotten era.

Half Hitch gin, born and bred in an old Victorian vault located right next to one of the biggest former gin warehouses, the Interchange Building, offers up a slice of old London, using the name of the strong rope knot that many barges used on the locks to moor up with.

To create his gin, Mark uses three different methods: copper pot distillation, vacuum distillation and hand crafted tinctures. He uses 100% British grain spirit within, and utilises botanicals such as Malawian black tea, Calabrian bergamot from Southern Italy, wood, hay and pepper.

But how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Half Hitch – 40%

A sweet, floral note on the nose, followed by delicate rose and lavender. Sharp lemon rind hits the palate on first taste, with a bold, fresh lavender profile coming through. Earth notes follow alongside a striking citrus kick that leads to a long fresh finish.

A good base gin for their signature serve too –

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Twisted Martini

Half Hitch Twisted Martini

Glass – 

Tumbler

Ingredients –

50 ml Half Hitch Gin
Orange Peel

Method – 

Pour over ice in a tumbler glass and garnish with orange peel.

“Sir Winston is quoted as saying “Glance at the vermouth bottle briefly while pouring the juniper distillate freely”. Hence, no vermouth in this Martini. This version takes one step further. No shake, no stir, just on the rocks.” source, http://www.halfhitch.london

A great gin that opens up the history of Camden Lock with a respectable brand, bringing focus on its unique blend of botanicals. Something different for your drinks cabinet.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Freelance Events Curator/Collaborator, Brand Development, Drink Journalist, Taster & Guide to the World of Drinks

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