Double Dutch

doube-dutch
The use of mixers has always been defined towards the likes of a gin and tonic, rum and coke or whisky and ginger, but the names and styles of such have pretty much stayed the same over the years. Lately though, numerous tonic brands have been released of a variety of flavours, then ultimately branching out into bitter lemon and cola, ginger and lemonade expressions.

Not Double Dutch though.

Released in 2014, Joyce and Raissa de Haas originate from the Netherlands, but became frustrated with the lack of soda options to go alongside the growth of spirits. After a year of research, the inspiration of food pairing ultimately grew to the brand of Double Dutch.

Releasing two flavoured soda expressions to the market, Pomegranate & Basil and Watermelon & Cucumber, it brought interest in not only the flavours chosen, but the fact that they deviated away from flavoured tonics and exploited the lesser used soda market. With this, flavour pairings became a favourite as the likes of the Pomegranate & Basil started to match with golden rum and tequila, with the Cucumber and Watermelon a favourite with salad dishes.

With another favourite option of having two soda expressions that are also easy to drink on its own, a call was made to carry on the smooth and natural profile of each into the tonic market, ultimately resulting in the release of an Indian Tonic expression, as well as a Slimline Tonic in 2015. All are low in calorie, winning over the likes of Richard Branson and his Virgin Foodpreneur Start Up in 2015 to help fund the growth of the brand.

With each bottle made without any artificial flavourings, colouring or preservatives, instead opting for natural ingredients blended with spring water from the North of England, the Double Dutch range kept expanding with the addition of their first flavoured tonic, Cranberry, released late 2016 in collaboration with Maison Hennessy Cognac.

So how do they fare? Well below are my tasting notes on the range so far –

Double Dutch Pomegranate & Basil – 0%

Red arils from the pomegranate fruits are used within. Subtle pomegranate comes through on the nose, followed by the earthy notes of the basil. Well-balanced between the two flavours on the palate, resulting in a slightly dry, basil aroma finish.

Double Dutch Cucumber & Watermelon – 0%

Fresh watermelon shines through on the nose, followed by an underlining cucumber note. A reverse of roles on the palate though as the fresh cucumber  pulls through the watermelon, although the bold finish brings the melon back for a lingering finish.

Double Dutch Indian Tonic – 0%

Made with quinine, juniper and grapefruit. The zest of grapefruit is apparent on the nose, followed by the earthy notes of juniper. Smooth on the palate, with gentle hits of the juniper coming through, surrounded by the aromas of the grapefruit and subtle quinine.

Double Dutch Slimline Tonic – 0%

With 60% fewer calories and sugar than the Indian Tonic. Soft, subtle notes of the grapefruit come though on the nose. The smooth kicks of light juniper hit the palate, offering a lingering quinine finish that’s slightly dry.

Double Dutch Cranberry Tonic – 0%

Fresh, ripe cranberry notes on the nose, with hints of stemmed ginger following. Smooth on the palate, with the cranberry offering up fresh bursts, followed by subtle warm ginger to create a lingering, slightly dry finish.

A great range to experience over ice, or the girls recommend it with one of their favourite gin brands –

double-dutch-and-three-rivers

Double Dutch and Three Rivers

Glass – 

Rocks

Ingredients – 

50 ml Manchester Three Rivers Gin
Top with Double Dutch Indian Tonic

Method – 

Fill a rocks glass with cubed ice and add the ingredients. Garnish with a stemmed cherry.

A refreshing change for your fridge, and with their versatility, one to play around with for sure. Pick some up for the drinks cabinet.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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