Rubis Chocolate Wine Tasting Notes

rubis

Everyone loves something a little different every now and then, and a brand that is causing a stir in the last year of so is the Spanish Rubis Chocolate Wine. I myself have heard this brand through the grapevine via Corks Out and have been desperate to see what all the fuss was about, so I promptly purchased a bottle to share with you all.

But what is it? Is it really chocolate?

Rubis defines itself as a ‘blend of fortified Tempranillo wine and premium chocolate flavour’. The Tempranillo grape, which is more commonly seen in Spanish Rioja, infuses with chocolate essence to offer an abundant of possibilities, and a surprise to the finished palate.

Rubis – 15%

A deep, dark hit of chocolate on the nose that develops into a soft velvet aroma with hints of raspberry. Soft presence on the palate with a lively beginning that soon smooths out. Light flavour of chocolate that creates a long finish with cherry flavours drying the end a little.

A rather indulgent offering here, and one that works very well being splashed over a few cubes of ice. I can see this working over chocolate based deserts as well, such is the diversity of the product. I’m yet to see this in cocktails, but it wouldn’t surprise me if it popped up soon.

Check out the rest of the photos, taken at The Circle 360, via my Facebook page.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Las Corazas Macabeo Tasting Notes

The Las Corazas Macabeo is the sister white wine to the Spanish Tempranillo (https://drinksenthusiast.wordpress.com/2011/07/31/las-corazes-tempranillo-tasting-notes/) and I cracked open the bottle to accompany some fresh river cobbler.

Las Corazas Macabeo

From the Castilla la Mancha region, this 3-year-old white gave off a subtle golden-yellow colour once poured. On the nose it gave off small amounts of floral extracts, an almost summer garden feeling. A buttery taste slowly hits your senses once you sip, with that floral sensation being slowly released as a gentle after-taste. It gives a slight dryness to your mouth after an initial watering sensation, and its relatively low acidity (the wine is marked at 12.5%) doesn’t give any harsh tones to the overall quality.

This is a great wine to have as both with a fish or seafood platter or as a social drink to share with friends. It’s relatively cheap (around £4 for a bottle) and wouldn’t look out-of-place on your wine rack.

There is a Tempranillo Rose available (unfortunately my bottle has been well and truly drunk over a year ago now).

I had the 3 Las Corazas types available as the house wine in the Spanish restaurant Casa Tapas. They accompanied a wide selection of dishes that we served including chorizo, seafood and meat paella, fried manchego and serrano ham. They were always a popular addition to any event that we organised and had some great feedback from customers. Give them a try!