Palmers

Palmers

Langley Distillery is famous for the production of many a famous gin tipple, including the aptly named Langley’s, Martin Millers and Broker’s. Third-party contracts have always been the name of the game for the Birmingham based company, but now they’ve decided to branch out and create their own tipple, defined by its heritage and history of the Palmer family.

The Palmers heritage can trace itself back to 1805 in Old Street, London, where the family varnish business were to be founded by William Henry Palmer. Once passed onto his son Walter, the business started to transition into alcohol production, which set the foundations for the company as we know it today with current great-grand daughter Angela, along with her husband, sparking the voyage into gin creation.

Taking the Crosswells Brewery site, itself dating from the early 1800’s and built over an ancient underground water source, the brewery changed itself into a distillery in 1920 and has some of the oldest working copper gin stills in the UK, some of which date back to the early 1800’s!

Palmers gin has been created with Angela in mind, which they say is “infused with Angela’s zest and love for life.” The gin itself has within a blend of 7 botanicals (juniper berries, coriander seeds, cassia bark, liquorice root, angelica root, orris root and grapefruit), the exact recipe of which is kept close to Angela’s son Adam and granddaughter Natalie. Each botanical is weighed out by hand and placed into the aptly-named copper still ‘Angela’ (commissioned in 1903) in a specific order, alongside water and British wheat spirit. The resulting mix if left to infuse overnight.

But how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Palmers – 44%

Light, subtle notes of lavender, parmer violet and grapefruit zest upon the nose, following onto the palate with a smooth start. Orange twist, with hints of waxy lemon, liquorice and an undertone of earthy notes, resulting in a warm kick of juniper berry.

A cracking gin on its own, but one that’s also worthy to be within one of these –

Palmers - White Lady
White Lady

Glass –

Martini

Ingredients – 

35ml Palmers London Dry Gin
25ml Cointreau
25ml Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice
25ml Sugar Syrup
Lemon Twist to garnish

Method – 

Combine all ingredients within an ice filled mixing glass and stir. Strain into a Martini glass and garnish with lemon twist.

A superb gin that really shows off the history and dedication that Langley’s have had, and have finally put their stamp on their own gin to rival the very many they have created for others over the years. One for the drinks cabinet for sure.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 

 

Broker’s Tasting Notes

Broker's

A gin, specially blended to be dry with an image driven to literally tip the hat to the gin craze of England. Broker’s does just that, the brain child of Martin and Andy Dawson. Broker’s has also won more top awards in international competitions over the last ten years than any other gin. But we’re getting ahead of ourselves here, lets scale back and see how it comes to such a high regard.

Launched in 1998, Martin and Andy Dawson utilised the services of Langley Distillery, Birmingham and their copper pot still ‘Constance’, itself manufactured by John Dore & Co, long recognised as the finest still-maker in the world. They set the task of re-creating a recipe (chosen after taste testing against several new recipes) that is said to be over 200 years old. Pure grain spirit made from English wheat is distilled four times before the addition of ten botanicals.

Juniper berries from Macedonia, coriander seed from Bulgaria, orris root and liquorice from Italy, nutmeg from India, cassia bark from Indonesia, cinnamon from the Seychelles, orange peel and lemon peel from Spain and angelica root from Poland make up the 24 hour steeping, before being distilled for a fifth and final time. 

So, how does this traditional London Dry fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Broker’s – 40%

Clean on the nose with a light, fragrant citrus aroma followed by hints of spice. Smooth juniper flavours blended with strong orange are evident on the palate. Very dry finish as the spice lingers.

Hits the spot for its traditionalism, but what if it were mixed into a classic cocktail?

Aviation
Aviation

Aviation

Glass – 

Martini

Ingredients –

60 ml Broker’s Gin
15 ml lemon juice
15 ml Maraschino Liqueur
1 tsp Crème de Violette

Method –

Shake with ice and strain into chilled Martini glass. No garnish.

A great addition, as well as a brand to add to your own drinks cabinet. Even the little bowler hat that adorns every Broker’s bottle can win you over (a theme for the brand that would be recognised for its Englishness – such a gentleman that adorns the label would typically have been a stockbroker in the City of London, hence the name). Both Andy and Martin are active in their promotion, attending many events in their signature bowler hats and as mentioned, winning many awards with their efforts. In 2013, Broker’s was Kosher approved by the Kashrut Division-London Beth Din (KLDB), making it accessible to an even wider audience. What more could you ask for from a gin?!

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Hunters Tasting Notes

Hunters

As some of you know, I’m a sucker for local produce. But one spirit that came on board at a recent venture of mine is a premium Cheshire gin named Hunters. Two men are behind the brand – Ian Cass who is a veteran of the on-trade and Jon Jones who is well-known in the off-trade. But how, in such a short space of time, has all this hype come about?

Hunters was conceived in Cheshire and made at the Langley Distillery. It’s produced by re-distilling neutral spirit with natural botanicals including juniper berries, citrus peel, angelica, orris root, orange peel and coriander seeds. All these are heated during its single batch distillation using a traditional copper pot still. Each botanical is individually marinated within neutral grain spirit before being distilled.

So how does this local gin fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Hunters – 43.3%

Citrus dominates on the nose with a slight spice following. Slight hit of the spice on the palate, although this develops quickly. Herb flavours come through with a slight dryness to finish. Lingers.

So a rather spicy offering, but does it work well within a cocktail?

Hunters White Lady

Glass – 

Martini

Ingredients

50 ml Hunters
25 ml Triple Sec
25 ml Fresh lemon juice
5 ml Egg white

Method

Shake, double strain and garnish with a lemon twist.

Hunters can be found in many bars, restaurants and pubs in and around Cheshire and Manchester, and only being less than a year old, I’d expect to see it in many more by the team it reaches its birthday. Or just pick one up for yourself.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.