Emily Says . . . . ‘Flor De Sevilla’

tanquerayIn her twelfth feature under ‘Emily Says . . .’, the voice to the Manchester bar scene in Emily Puckering looks at Ginuary over Dry January;

The New Year is well and truly upon us, and a new year usually means one thing: Dry January. But I’m not here to talk about that nonsense! I’m here to talk about “Ginuary”, and what gins have appeared under my radar so far this month.

With Tanqueray being one of the most popular London Dry Gins known, the arrival of Tanqueray Flor De Sevilla has caught not only my attention, but the attention of the bartending community. But firstly, what exactly is Tanqueray all about?

Founded by Charles Tanqueray in 1830 in Bloomsbury, London, Tanqueray still holds the original recipe that has stood the test of almost one hundred and eighty years. The distillery, however, was severely damaged during World War Two in 1941. The only surviving piece of equipment was one of the stills that was nicknamed “Old Tom”, and made the move with them to the new and current distillery in Cameron Bridge, Scotland.

The story of Tanqueray Flor De Sevilla begins in Spain’s sun-drenched Seville, a place brimming with fresh and beautiful flavours; including its vastly growing gin market. Traditionally, the recipe follows the original that is used for Tanqueray London Dry, but involves a beautiful blend of sevilla orange essences and other fine botanicals, including classics such as juniper and angelica root, all of which are distilled four times over.

On the nose, the zesty aromas of the sevilla oranges dominate the first initial smell. A sweet and fragrant aroma that connotes a warm summers evening; something that we all need in this frosty month!

With an ABV of 41.3%, Flor De Sevilla delivers the perfect zesty balance of classic Tanqueray on the palate, with the delightfully predictable notes of sevilla orange. Whilst this gin remains citrus heavy, fresh and floral notes are present, creating a long and fruity finish.

This citrusy little number is perfect served as a 50ml double over ice with an Indian tonic water. In terms of garnish, there’s no need to go over-board for this one. A simple wedge of orange will do just nicely… not forgetting to squeeze over the finishing product! A personal favourite at the moment, Tanq’s Flor De Sevilla is a ‘must try’ in 2019.

Photo Cred: Tanqueray

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Oxley Gin Unveils New Bottle Inspired By Sub Zero Distillation

Oxley_750ml_HiRes6417x8411Oxley Gin, the very first gin to be cold distilled, has launched its new bottle design inspired by the inventive production process behind its unmistakably bright and intense spirit. Available from selected retailers, the new bottle brings to life the story of this inventive spirit, from eight years of experimentation to its unbelievably cold distillation. The incredible meld of science and nature in every bottle of OXLEY gin guarantees a fresh take on traditional botanicals for a sip-worthy smoothness.

UNMISTAKABLY OXLEY
From the bespoke ice bucket mould resembling a vacuum as a nod to the scientific methods used by OXLEY, to the soft white, botanical green and pale matt silver colour palate, the new bottle is intended as a visual representation of the obsession of OXLEY gin to keeping its botanicals true to nature to give a crisp and distinct freshness.

A new neck label notes the invention date of the super-premium gin while the individual bottle number demonstrates the genuine small-batch production methods of the brand, which ensures that not even a single drop is wasted.

AN INVENTIVE SPIRIT
Florent Demars, UK Brand Manager – OXLEY gin comments “Since the invention of OXLEY, the very first cold distilled gin, we have strived to be completely faithful to nature by using the pioneering scientific techniques of sub-zero temperatures. On a quest for flavour, we have succeeded in what we set out to do and we’re proud to now have a bottle that tells this inspiring story.”

 

Emily Says . . . . ‘MFDF18’

The Gin Lounge

In her tenth feature under ‘Emily Says . . .’, the voice to the Manchester bar scene in Emily Puckering looks at the MFDF’s Gin Lounge;

The Manchester Food and Drink Festival 2018 is currently underway, and as always, it has a fantastic range of new foods and drinks to offer. Created back in 1998 by Phil Jones, the original concept was to demonstrate that Manchester has much more to offer than just, I quote, ‘meat pies and gravy’! Over the last twenty years, MFDF has achieved a national status whilst watching the drinking and dining scene of Manchester be transformed into the incredible industry it is today.

Naturally, my attention was immediately stolen by the drinking side to MFDF this year, in particular the Gin Festival put together by the Gin Lounge. For two days only, The Gin Lounge held an exclusive event showcasing some of the UK’s favourite gins. With the number of gin distilleries soaring across the UK, the choice of what gin to drink is becoming endless, so The Gin Lounge put on display some new faces to the world of gin.
For any gin enthusiast, The Gin Lounge put on a spectacular event. Sponsored by Fentimans, a range of flavoured tonics were on hand at all times to mix and match with the different gins tasted, ranging from a standard Indian tonic to a Valencian Orange tonic. An ice and garnish station provided an array of herbs and fruits that were designed to complement perfectly each unique gin available. Gin cocktail stands and a gourmet food van finished off the event beautifully, offering something for every gin lover.

As a representative of the North and in particular, Manchester, I found myself leaning towards the Manchester-based distilleries that made an appearance at this year’s gin festival. Three major Manchester distilleries really caught my eye during my time here at the gin festival, so here are the ones that I would truly recommend in indulging in:

The Gin Lounge 2

Didsbury Gin
https://www.didsburygin.com/

Created in the heart of Manchester’s Didsbury, Liam Manton and Mark Smallwood went out to create a citrusy twist on the classic London dry gin under just two years ago. Inspiration was taken from the botanical gardens of Parsonage and Fletcher Moss that date all the way back to 1919 since been gifted to the people of Didsbury by a quintessential English village.
Using traditional artisan methods and infusing modern botanicals such as hand-peeled fresh citrus and juniper, Didsbury gin offers a zesty and fresh drinking experience, with strong notes of citrus fruits such as lemon and grapefruit. These citrus notes allow the gin to be easily drank neat, and is mixed beautifully with Fentimans Indian tonic water.
The Raspberry and Elderflower edition of Didsbury gin is something truly outstanding. Rather than a standard raspberry gin (or more commonly known as ‘pink gin’), the elderflower balances out the usual sweetness that is associated with raspberry flavours, delivering a fruity yet crisp gin.

The Gin Lounge 3

Thomas Dakin Gin
http://www.thomasdakin.com/

A Manchester gin that dates back centuries, Thomas Dakin is surely the household name for gins in the North West. All the way back in 1761, Thomas Dakin began distilling gin in Warrington at the age of twenty five. With Dakin’s inventive and modern outlook upon the distillation process, he created a high quality English gin, despite the negative attitudes towards the distillation of one’s own gin at the time.
Styled around the classic London dry gin, Thomas Dakin is a juniper-led gin created with the use of eleven botanicals. Those botanicals include juniper, orange zest, angelica, grapefruit and English coriander seeds. Whilst the recipe itself remains a well-hidden secret, the knowledge of the botanicals used backs up perfectly the drinking experience that Thomas Dakin provides.
Sweet and citrusy notes dominate the overall flavour, which are beautifully backed up by the spicy and earthy notes provided by botanicals such as angelica and coriander. Mixed with Fentimans pink grapefruit tonic water.

The Gin Lounge 4

Manchester Three Rivers Gin
http://www.manchesterthreerivers.com/

Manchester Three Rivers gin is exactly what the name says. It is named after the three rivers that ran through the city before Manchester’s famous canals took over: Irwell, Irk and Medlock. It was these rivers that pumped life into the city and allowed for its many industries to develop and thrive.
The distillery was located close to the banks of Irk, which is what inspired the name for this Manchester gin. The area has a rich history of creativity and production, and Three Rivers has certainly paid homage to the area with their fantastic creation.
Produced by hand in small batches only by master distiller Dave Rigby, Three Rivers is a well-balanced gin using eleven botanicals, including vanilla, cinnamon, cardamom and almond. Overall, the gin delivers a smooth drinking experience with a slight sweetness on the tongue. It is finished with a spicy black pepper kick, all thanks to the use of cardamom. Three Rivers was mixed perfectly with Fentimans Connoisseurs tonic water.
Manchester Three Rivers also offers an exclusive Gin Experience, allowing one to distil and bottle their very own unique gin in the Three Rivers distillery.

The King of Soho Is In The Pink With New Gin launch

The King of Soho Variorium and OriginalThe King of Soho is adding a new addition to its colourful line-up with the introduction of the King of Soho Variorum Gin, a berry edition of the original London Dry.

The King of Soho Variorum Gin adds a hint of pink and notes of strawberry to complement the essential juniper and citrus flavours of the classic recipe, making it ideal to be enjoyed over ice, in cocktails and mixed drinks; served with a strawberry garnish. The creativity and literary works of Soho are the inspiration behind the name – in literature, a variorum edition is an original work with notes.

With the original King of Soho London Dry celebrating its fifth anniversary in October 2018, the King of Soho Variorum is a new twist on the classic, with a lower ABV of 37.5%. It has been created to appeal to a broader audience and reflects the brand’s modernity. In its vivid red bottle, Variorum Gin is a vivacious and fun companion to the King of Soho London Dry; the perfect pair to stand out on the shelf or bar – day and night

Like the original, Variorum is distributed in the UK & Ireland on-trade and off-trade by Hi-Spirits. The King of Soho brand is the creation of West End Drinks, owned by entrepreneurs Alex Robson and Howard Raymond, and styled after Howard’s father, the legendary Soho theatre impresario and businessman Paul Raymond.

Alex Robson, managing director of West End Drinks, said: “The King of Soho Variorum Gin is a celebration of the colour and style of Soho; a pink berry spirit inspired by the creativity and literature of London’s iconic district, to join our smooth and premium drinks line-up.

“We launched the original King of Soho classic London Dry almost five years ago, and the King of Soho Variorum Gin builds on that success with an appeal to a gin consumer who is looking for a slightly lower ABV and berry notes in their drinks and cocktails. Crafted in London , it reflects the modernity and innovation of our brand and the ever-changing spirit that is Soho.”

The signature serve for The King of Soho Variorum is the Variorum Cooler:

50ml King of Soho Variorum Gin
120ml Cranberry Juice
120ml Pink Grapefruit Juice
Build in a tall glass filled with cubed ice, and garnish with a grapefruit twist and a strawberry.

The King of Soho Variorum launches in late July, with a RSP of £33.50.

Scottish Gin Caorunn Partner with International Fashion Designer

Caouroon 2

The premium Scottish gin Caorunn (pronounced “ka-roon”) is proud to announce a collaboration with multiple award-winning creator of cutting-edge kilts, Siobhan Mackenzie. Siobhan has created a bespoke kilt, the iconic handcrafted Scottish garment, celebrating Caorunn’s contemporary tartan which is officially registered by The Scottish Tartan Authority.

The collaboration will champion Scottish craftsmanship in which designer Siobhan Mackenzie has taken inspiration from the Scottish handcrafted gin Caorunn to create a bespoke kilt.

While the traditional kilt dates to the 1720s, Mackenzie’s extremely eye-catching, contemporary stance, sees her contrast multiple fabrics and colours, leading to unexpected style features. Chiming with her ethos, Mackenzie describes Caorunn as a particularly current brand underpinned by a strong sense of Scottish craft.

Siobhan Mackenzie says: ‘I was filled with inspiration on how to take the Caorunn tartan forward in a way which emulates the beauty aesthetic form of the Caorunn bottle. Master Distiller, Simon Buley’s attention to detail, his commitment to using the highest quality ingredients and the exquisite level of craftsmanship is what makes Caorunn.’

Proudly small batch, handcrafted premium gin distilled in the heart of the Scottish Highlands harnessing pure, natural Scottish water, and is infused with five locally foraged botanicals, being: dandelion, heather, coul bush apple, bog myrtle and rowan berries working in harmony with six traditional gin botanicals.

Caorunn is created personally, in a unique way by Gin Master, Simon Buley. Simon forages local Celtic botanicals on the hills around Balmenach Distillery and expertly oversees the infusion of Caorunn in the world’s only working Copper Berry Chamber. The slow infusion of this chamber sets Caorunn apart.

Simon Buley, Caorunn master distiller, says; “The terroir, the process and the people ensure passion, innovation and tradition are poured into every bottle of Caorunn Gin. We are proud others are able to take inspiration in what we do. I strongly believe in championing Scottish craftsmanship and Siobhan is the perfect example of what makes it so special.”

The unisex Caorunn kilt is formed of a staple black skirt replete with a swoosh of grey Caorunn tartan running through back pleats, finished with a touch of tartan on the waistband and fringe. ‘It can be taken from day to night in a heartbeat,’ says Mackenzie. ‘The daytime look may be teamed with a cashmere sweater, long riding boots and tights; for the evening, it can be paired with black heels and blouse.’ The menswear kilt, meanwhile, may be worn formally with black or grey Argyll kilt jacket and waistcoat, with black kilt socks and shoes, or casually with boots and a polo shirt or sweater.

Shop the brand at http://www.siobhanmackenzie.com/.

Gin Sul

GinSul-WebsizeHamburg may not be the first place you think of for creating gin, but the rules have changed and Gin Sul has made its way to the UK from Hamburg’s only gin distillery!

Masterminded by Stephan Garbe, he was inspired by his time living in Costa Vicentina in south-west Portugal and decided to use the botanicals of the country, including lemons and Rockrose. Unable to create his idea in Portugal itself, he set up in Hamburg to produce a German version of his Portuguese idea, Gin Sul becoming the result.

Produced by hand, fresh lemons are sent over from Portugal, arriving at the distillery on an almost weekly basis. Peeled by hand, the fresh peels are combined with juniper berries, coriander, rosemary, peppers, lavender, cinnamon and gum rockrose (Cistus Ladanifer) amongst others. Small batches of just 100 litres are created each time.

Their distinctive white bottles are made from stoneware, then glazed and screen printed, before being filled by hand. But how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Gin Sul – 43%

Fresh zest of the lemons come through immediately upon the nose, followed by dry pepper and subtle lavender. Very soft upon the palate, offering up a waxy lemon peel, rosemary scent and dry pepper dusting. A lingering finish, with a slight heat on the tongue, and fresh juniper kick.

Very different indeed, and one that could work very well within a Martini or Vesper for sure. A talking point for your drinks cabinet, even if it’s the bottle alone before you crack it open.

Genießen!

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Emily Says . . . . ‘Yorkshire Tea’

Masons Dry Yorkshire Gin

In her fifth feature under ‘Emily Says . . .’, the voice to the Manchester bar scene in Emily Puckering looks at the Yorkshire Tea and Gin combination;

Gin has truly taken over the world in the last couple of years. It is what everyone is talking about, and it is what everyone is ordering over the bar. More and more brands and varieties of gin appear day by day, making ones choice of what to drink rather difficult.

A gin that stands out to me is Masons Dry Yorkshire Gin… and I promise this has nothing to do with the fact that I’m from Yorkshire! Masons was created by Karl and Cathy Mason, a pair of gin enthusiasts who initially began blogging and reviewing different types of gin prior to their creation.

What makes their gin truly unique is what the Masons decided to put in it. Using pure Yorkshire water and the classic essence of Juniper, alongside Fennel, Coriander seeds, Cardamom and Szechuan pepper, Masons gin became known for its bold and distinctive dry taste.

But I am not here to talk about Masons original dry gin. Masons Dry Yorkshire gin Tea Edition has taken centre stage. Again, I’m sure this has nothing to do with me being from Yorkshire, but I absolutely love tea… as do many of us Brits. And what could possibly be better than a collaboration of gin and the finest Yorkshire tea?

The distillation process of this 42 percent gin involves 665 Yorkshire teabags (to be precise!) being cut up and mixed with the rest of the classic recipe before being distilled. A pairing of flavours that doesn’t often trend, the combination of tea and gin is truly an unusual one, but one of curiosity and individuality.

On the nose, this gin delivers lovely dark tannin notes, mixing beautifully with the bold juniper and the spices of fennel and cardamom. On first sip, these spices instantly bring out the crisp punch of Yorkshire Tea; something pleasantly different compared to a usual gin and tonic. The risk of collaborating tea with gin is the chance of bringing out the perfumed notes, of which can be way too tangent on the mouth. The presence of citrus fruits such as lemons in Masons, however, prevents the gin from being overpowered by these perfume essences, and instead gives a refreshing and punchy finish.

The perfect serve of Masons Dry Yorkshire gin Tea Edition is recommended to be served with a premium Indian tonic, and a simple twist of lemon peel for a garnish. Perfect!

Credit:
Masons Gin
Buon Vino

Caorunn Updates Its Look With New Bottle And Serves

Caouroon

Approaching ten years at the pinnacle of the premium gin market, Caorunn has released a brand new, British made bottle marrying the fine spirit’s artisan roots with seriously sleek aesthetics.

The bottle represents the five natural Scottish botanicals which surround the Speyside distillery and are hand harvested by Carounn’s Gin Master, Simon Buley. The decanter’s signature pentagonal shape and five-pointed asterisk base, a nod to the Caorunn’s locally foraged botanicals, have been redefined, providing added presence to the eye-catching gin whether it is encountered in a bar or the home of a discerning drinker.
Crafted from extra white Flint glass, the desirable bottle will help assure a new generation of gin aficionados to reach for the clean and crisp, invigorating and distinctly aromatic spirit of Scotland.

Caorunn’s journey of flavour, which sees coul blush apple, heather, dandelion, bog myrtle and rowan berry act in harmony with six traditional gin ingredients and crystal clear Scottish water, adheres to the same, richly acclaimed recipe as when the spirit came to market in 2009. The distinctive taste has helped the gin grow year-on-year to become one of the top five super premium gin brands within the UK (as reported by Nielsen*) which is celebrated daily by judicious drinkers in more than 35 countries.
With an emphasis on Caorunn’s character and modernity, the bottle’s re-design was accomplished by the creative minds at design agency, JDO.

Group Creative Director at JDO, Ben Oates was tasked with evolving the iconic five pointed shape to encapsulate the Scottish Highland heritage with a contemporary edge and elegant design. Graphics Specialist, Ray Smith focused on enhancing Caorunn’s exquisite craftsmanship through embossed details. Production Director, James Davies embraced contemporary labelling techniques with traditional craftsmanship by adding tactility through raised gloss varnishing, profiling the red asterix and placing it proudly at the top of the new 3D structure.

Rachael Engley, Glass Producer at Allied Glass, in Knottingley, West Yorkshire says she is very pleased with the thought provoking production, particularly ‘its exquisite colour’.
Acclaimed drinks culture writer, mixologist and long term supporter of Caorunn, Tristan Stephenson believes the enhanced bottle shape is both ‘beautiful and functional, allowing bartenders to keep the clean and crisp gin close to hand.’ Tristan admires the superb shelf presence and user friendly features ‘which now match the handcrafted, versatile taste, creating an enjoyable drink experience for all involved.’
Meanwhile, drinks columnist and gastronomy consultant, Douglas Blyde rates the ‘natural cork and sense of paired down luxe’ noting, ‘no wonder Carounn feel at home as supporters of London Art Fair.’

The signature for Simon Buley, Caorunn Gin Master, is printed on each bottle of Caorunn to reflect that he alone oversees the entire craftsmanship process for each vessel.
Simon comments: “I am proud to see Caorunn showcased within such an exquisite bottle. The design has taken into consideration the Celtic botanicals foraged on the hills around Balmenach Distillery and how Caorunn is infused in the world’s only working Copper Berry Chamber. The care and attention of the spirit and bottle sets Caorunn apart.”

Below are a selection of new Caorunn cocktails made by renowned mixologist Tristan Stephenson – both his serves are the perfect tipple to have with friends on a cold winter’s night!

Caorunn Cooler by Tristan Stephenson
Caorunn Cooler by Tristan Stephenson

Ingredients
50ml Caorunn gin
150ml Herbal apple soda*
*1 part lemon juice
7 parts apple juice
7 parts green tea
Hot brew the green tea to extract the flavour and tannins, and allow to cool.
Mix ingredients well and chill in a fridge.
Carbonate using a sodastream
Method
Build in a glass
Garnish
Sage leaf
Glass
Highball
Fireside by Tristan Stephenson
Fireside by Tristan Stephenson
Ingredients
50ml Caorunn
10ml Lemon juice
10ml Ginger juice
80ml Apple juice
Method
Build in a glass
Garnish
Honey roasted walnuts
Glass
Serve in a highball glass

Marian Beke & The Gibson Bar Launch Copperhead Gin The Gibson Edition

Copperhead Gin The Gibson Edition2018 is the year of spirits innovation for Marian Beke & The Gibson Bar London. Creating brand new spirits based on radically different concepts, Marian launched his first initiative at his bar The Gibson on 12 February. He partners with Copperhead, the ultra-premium gin from Belgium, to create a whole new style of savoury gin. With a hint of spice and umami intensity, it complements the classic Gibson martini and its garnish of pickled onion. The gleaming, dark green bottle is inspired by the original green tiling of the heritage-listed Edwardian façade of The Gibson bar. At 40 percent abv, it is available to the trade via distributor 10 Degrees C. The guide retail price is £35 to £40 for a 50cl bottle.

The new gin uses five original Copperhead botanicals of juniper, coriander seed, cardamom, angelica, and orange peel, and adds 14 pickling spices. These include mace, pepper, cassia, bay leaf, ginger, allspice, fennel and dill seeds. It is finished with a flourish of eight year old genever.

The worldwide launch (12 February) was naturally hosted at The Gibson bar London. For two consecutive years since its launch, The Gibson bar has featured in The World’s 50 Best Bars, attracting fans of classic martinis and experimental serves.

Bartenders and buyers are welcome to visit The Gibson for a taste of the new gin: 44 Old Street, London EC1V 9AQ. http://www.thegibsonbar.london.

New cocktails using Copperhead Gin The Gibson Edition will feature on the new menu and as specials. It will also be launched in other markets worldwide, and production will be on-going.

Palmers

Palmers

Langley Distillery is famous for the production of many a famous gin tipple, including the aptly named Langley’s, Martin Millers and Broker’s. Third-party contracts have always been the name of the game for the Birmingham based company, but now they’ve decided to branch out and create their own tipple, defined by its heritage and history of the Palmer family.

The Palmers heritage can trace itself back to 1805 in Old Street, London, where the family varnish business were to be founded by William Henry Palmer. Once passed onto his son Walter, the business started to transition into alcohol production, which set the foundations for the company as we know it today with current great-grand daughter Angela, along with her husband, sparking the voyage into gin creation.

Taking the Crosswells Brewery site, itself dating from the early 1800’s and built over an ancient underground water source, the brewery changed itself into a distillery in 1920 and has some of the oldest working copper gin stills in the UK, some of which date back to the early 1800’s!

Palmers gin has been created with Angela in mind, which they say is “infused with Angela’s zest and love for life.” The gin itself has within a blend of 7 botanicals (juniper berries, coriander seeds, cassia bark, liquorice root, angelica root, orris root and grapefruit), the exact recipe of which is kept close to Angela’s son Adam and granddaughter Natalie. Each botanical is weighed out by hand and placed into the aptly-named copper still ‘Angela’ (commissioned in 1903) in a specific order, alongside water and British wheat spirit. The resulting mix if left to infuse overnight.

But how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Palmers – 44%

Light, subtle notes of lavender, parmer violet and grapefruit zest upon the nose, following onto the palate with a smooth start. Orange twist, with hints of waxy lemon, liquorice and an undertone of earthy notes, resulting in a warm kick of juniper berry.

A cracking gin on its own, but one that’s also worthy to be within one of these –

Palmers - White Lady
White Lady

Glass –

Martini

Ingredients – 

35ml Palmers London Dry Gin
25ml Cointreau
25ml Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice
25ml Sugar Syrup
Lemon Twist to garnish

Method – 

Combine all ingredients within an ice filled mixing glass and stir. Strain into a Martini glass and garnish with lemon twist.

A superb gin that really shows off the history and dedication that Langley’s have had, and have finally put their stamp on their own gin to rival the very many they have created for others over the years. One for the drinks cabinet for sure.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.