Tag Archives: recipe

Ron de Jeremy

Ron de Jeremy
Most spirit brands in the world will have some association with a celebrity, entrepreneur, fellow brand within a different sector, or in this case, a porn star. Define Ron Jeremy as an actor and all of a sudden the taboo goes away. After all, George Clooney and Dan Ackroyd are two who stand out as a perfect example of crafting a spirit and promoting it as such.

I’m not going to focus on the man himself though for this feature, as it’s the rum that hits the table in the form of its XO and Spiced expressions.

The XO is said to celebrate the extraordinary life of Ron Jeremy, seeing a blend of selected pot and column still based rums from Barbados, Trinidad and Guyana, aged for up to 15 years within ex-American oak bourbon barrels. It’s spiced expression uses rums from Trinidad and blended with exotic spices.

But how do they fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Ron de Jeremy XO – 40%

Honey, toasted maple syrup and walnut come through upon the nose. Smooth offerings of sweet honeycomb, toffee and slight burnt cinnamon on the palate, leading to a lingering thick vanilla finish.

Ron de Jeremy Spiced Hardcore Edition – 47%

Rich nutmeg, toffee and fudge aromas on the nose, followed by toasted marshmellow. Soft, sweet caramel on the palate, with slight orange rind and warm cinnamon powder, resulting in a long lingering finish.

Good sipping rums, and a cracking base for something like this;

Ron de Jeremy
Cherry J Sour

Glass – 

Rocks

Ingredients – 

50 ml Ron de Jeremy Reserva
20 ml Fresh Lemon Juice
20 ml Cherry Marnier
10 ml Creme de Cacao Dark
1 Barspoon Galliano
5 Drops Plum Bitters
20 ml Egg White

Method – 

Shake all ingredients over ice and double strain over ice filled rocks glass. Top with grated chocolate.

A great talking point for your drinks cabinet, and the spirits stand up, so it’s not just the expected gimmick!

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Zeca

Zeca

Cachaça is a criminally underrated Brazilian spirit, with most bars and restaurants stocking it out of curiosity, rather than intent. The cachaça based Caipirinha is probably the most well-known signature serve from the category, with many venues pushing flavoured variations to their customers as if the fruit were the last available.

But what about just taking a seat and enjoying the spirit for what it is? Capturing a country within its reasoning, much the same way we look at whisky from Scotland, tequila from Mexico or Armagnac from France.

With this mindset, lets take a look at Zeca, new to the UK market and recently launched into the likes of Selfridges and Harvey Nichols.

Hailing from the apparent lush green mountains of Brazil’s hidden Zona Da Mata, in Minas Gerais, Zeca has been hand-crafted by the Matos family estate for over 100 years, using only traditional methods. Utilising once-pressed sugar cane grown at high altitude, the juice is distilled in old alambiques and resulting in Zeca, itself paying homage to Joseph “Zeca” de Matos, the first of the family to be born in Brazil and son of the pioneer Antonio de Matos, who moved from Portugal in 1891 to settle in the untamed region of Minas Gerais.

Created by Marcos Matos and Tony Austin, the focus is not solely on the liquid itself, but also the aesthetics of the brand, including the bottle illustration that brings to life the diversity and beautiful abundance of the Minas Gerais gem stones producing region of Zona da Mata. The blue colour apparently stands for the gem amethyst, whilst the purple celebrates the oxidised colour of the alambique copper, the most traditional cachaça distilling apparatus that they utilise.
The Tamanduá anteater is the brand’s most lively character, a natural pest control who roams the sugar cane fields at night eating the ants.

So how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Zeca – 40%

Passionfruit and dried banana peel come through on the nose, with hints of fresh sugarcane present. Damp earth blended with rich sugarcane and flesh fruit on the palate, bringing in a slight zest spice. A long finish.

A real kick of artisan Brazil, perfect to be sipped. Although they do recommend it, if you wish to have a longer serve, with fresh ginger beer or homemade lemonade. One to add to your drinks cabinet if you wish to pack a Brazilian offering to your friends and family.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Boodles

Boodles Mulberry

Standing out in the ever-growing gin world can be hard work. Staying in can be an even harder task as the consumer trends can waiver at the drop of a hat. It’s with this that I take a look at a gin that I’ve worked with on the odd occasion over the last few years, but never really sat down to take an in-depth look.

So, here goes.

Despite only hitting the shelves since June 2013, Boodles Gin is associated with the likes of Ian Fleming and Winston Churchill due to its history stretching back to 1845. Named after the Pall Mall Gentleman’s Club called Boodles, over time it became increasingly hard to find here in the UK. Resurrected by G&J Distillers, it continues to be different in not including any citrus botanicals on the assumption that it will always be served with lemon or lime.

The gin itself? British wheat spirit base with non-citrus led botanicals including nutmeg, sage and rosemary. But it’s not the original I want to focus on today, it’s their Mulberry expression.
Paying homage to the mulberry tree, a familiar site in the English countryside, they’ve taken the opportunity to feed a fresh interpretation of the more traditional sloe gin. Made with mulberries, the Boodles gin itself and a blend of natural ingredients, Boodles Mulberry became the first ever Mulberry expression to hit America.

But how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Boodles Mulberry – 30%

Thin notes of fresh raspberry and soft currents upon the nose, with a silky texture offering upon the palate. Slightly dry, the fresh kicks of soft berry create a sweet, warm finish that lasts long on the finish.

A tasty tipple on its own, a fizz concoction should not go unnoticed;

Boodles - Mulberry Fizz
Mulberry Fizz

Glass – 

Coupe / Collins

Ingredients – 

60 ml Boodles Mulberry
30 ml Lemon Juice
2 Mint Leaves
Soda Water

Method – 

Combine Mulberry gin, lemon juice and mint in a shaker with ice. Shake and strain into a Collins glass over fresh ice and top with soda water.

A great variation on the berry styled gin liqueurs on the market, and one that seems to offer flexibility in how it can be consumed! One to offer a space to in your drinks cabinet. 

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

A Romantic Cocktail To Warm Up Valentine’s Day

feeneys-irish-coffee
After a romantic meal with your loved one, why not end the evening sipping a delicious Feeney’s Irish Coffee in front of a roaring fire.

Feeney’s Irish Coffee is easy to make too. Heat gently 100 ml Feeney’s Irish Cream Liqueur with 1 cup of freshly brewed coffee and serve in a toddy glass topped with 1 teaspoon of whipped cream and grated chocolate.

Feeney’s Irish Cream is marketed as the world’s most luxurious Irish Cream Liqueur and contains 100% Irish whiskey. Feeney’s is masterfully distilled in the heart of Ireland and matured for at least three years and is available from:

Tesco’s which stocks 1 litre bottles RRP: £15.00 and 31Dover.com which stocks 70cl bottles RRP: £12.50 and 1 litre RRP: £15.00 and Amazon. ABV: 17%

Glen Grant Whisky Toasts Burns Night With A Haggis Cocktail

the-chieftain-3
For Burns Night, multi award-winning Scotch Whisky, Glen Grant, has partnered with The Bon Vivant bar in Edinburgh to create the ‘The Chieftain’, a haggis-infused cocktail named after Robert Burns’ famous description of Scotland’s national dish, the “great chieftain o’ the pudding race”.

Created by Will Cox of The Bon Vivant, The Chieftain’s recipe is inspired by a traditional Burns Supper menu and includes the ingredients found in the occasion’s centerpiece.

Haggis is traditionally made from sheep’s offal (heart, liver and lungs) minced with onion, oatmeal, salt and spices. The Chieftain comprises of an oat-washed Glen Grant 10 Year Old combined with an offal stock syrup to replicate the unique meaty haggis flavour. It is served with a pickled red onion, representing the ‘heart’, a salt and pepper air, representing the ‘lungs’, a turnip cordial, a nod to the famous ‘neeps’ accompaniment, and a haggis rim.

Will Cox said: “The opportunity to team up with one of Scotland’s most iconic whiskies, Glen Grant, to make a Burns Night cocktail was too good to miss. It was very challenging, but we had a lot of fun coming up with The Chieftain and are looking forward to serving it to customers with a haggis bon bon or two on Burns nicht.”

Nick Williamson, Marketing Director Campari UK, said: “With the bard’s birthday being such a well-loved celebration, we want to mark the occasion with the same creativity the man himself approached his work. The bar team at the Bon Vivant has done a remarkable job with The Chieftain and we look forward to raising a glass or two in celebration come the 25th January.”

Glen Grant’s new range of aged single malt Scotch whiskies has continued to turn heads as it secured some of the whisky industry’s most prestigious awards in 2016, including the Glen Grant 10 Year Old winning Best Single Malt Scotch (10 Years and Younger) for the fifth year in a row in Jim Murray’s Whisky Bible.

THE CHIEFTAIN RECIPE:

Glen Grant 10 year old, oat washed
Offal stock glaze
Salt and pepper air
Pickled red onion
Turnip cordial
Haggis butter crumb

The Chieftain will be available to buy in The Bon Vivant Bar, 55 Thistle St, Edinburgh EH2 1DY for one night only on 25th January 2016 priced at £9.

Rhum Clément

rhum-clement
Agricole is becoming more and more frequent within bars across the UK as bartenders are starting to embrace its sugar cane juice qualities. There are numerous brands leading the way, including Rhum Clément of Martinique, part of the French Caribbean Islands that also includes the likes of Guadeloupe and Saint-Barthélemy.

It’s Rhum Clément I’ll be focusing on here, looking back from the late 1800’s to the modern-day.

1887 is where we start with the purchase of the prestigious 43 hectare sugar plantation, Domaine de L’Acajou by a gentleman named Homère Clément, a physician and mayor of Le François. It’s here he pioneered Rhum Agricole. In 1917, Homère Clément created a distillery to fulfill the large request of alcohol during the first World War, using the fresh free-run sugarcane juice available to him.

After the death of Homère Clément in 1923, his son Charles Clément took over the business. He is credited with perfecting his family’s Rhum Agricole method and honed his craft while studying distillation at the famous Louis Pasteur School in France. It was Charles Clément who first bottled Rhum Agricole in Martinique and branded it after his father. Charles Clément was also the first to export bottles of Martinique Rhum Agricole and developed France as the first great market for Rhum Agricole outside of the Caribbean.

In 1973, Charles Clément  passed away, succeeded by his son, Georges-Louis, who was in charge of production and his two brothers Jean-José and Marcel-André, who increased the visibility of Rhum Clément throughout the Caribbean, Europe, Central and South America, and North America.

Once 1986 rolled around, Rhum Clément was sold to the Hayot family, who remained close to the Clément family in order to keep what was now one of Martinique’s great cultural assets, Habitation Clément, in Martinique hands. The Hayot family continue to this day to maintain the heritage, culture and passion of the Clément family and Rhum Clément.

In 1996, the agricultural rum of Martinique gains the Denomination of Controlled Origin (AOC), alongside the Creole home, the terrace and the dependences all classified as Listed buildings by the Ministry of Culture, a testament of Habitation Clément that had been re-vitalized previously with investment in new cellars for aging rhum, a reception for tourists, art galleries and tasting room for visitors.

So steeped into the Martinique history, but how does it all fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes on my experiences so far –

Rhum Clément Canne Bleue – 50%

The first mono-varietal rum in the world, resulting from the juice of one single variety of sugar cane called ‘canne bleue’.
A sweet grass note on the nose, with soft earth and subtle cane juice coming through. A good hit of the fresh-cut grass on the palate, with the natural sugars imparting nicely and its builds to a fresh, thin yet bold finish.

Rhum Clément Select Barrel – 40%

Crafted with a unique blend of rhums matured in selected oak barrels with a particularly heavy toasting selected by their cellar master.
Subtle dry oak upon the nose, with hints of orange rind and cocoa nip following. A smooth profile on the palate, with a fresher note of the orange and cocoa hitting. Subtle fresh sugar cane creeps in on the lingering finish.

Amazing tots to enjoy on their own, even the 50% stylings of the Canne Bleue is easy to sip. Of course, for a simple mix, the traditional signature serve is always a good shout –

clement-ti-punch
Ti’Punch by Clément

Glass – 

Rocks

Ingredients – 

60 ml Rhum Clément Canne Bleue
30 ml Sugar Syrup
1 wedge of Lime

Method –

Stir all ingredients over ice, squeezing in the lime wedge. Serve.

A fantastic example of Martinique rhum agricole, one that seems to offer a wide range of versatility, whether enjoyed straight, over ice or within a simple served cocktail, a bottle or two would not look out-of-place within your drinks cabinet.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Estancia

estancia
Estancia is one of a handful of brands leading the way in the teachings of Raicilla, one of the many branches from Mezcal. When talking Mezcal, it encompasses such subcategories as Tequila, Sotol and Bacanora. Raicilla is also within these, seen as the softer, less smoky variation, closer to the Mezcal style, than that of Sotol which offers more grassy, smoky and earthy flavours.

It’s with this that Raicilla stands out as consumers branch out in their agave experiences, and Estancia is their to offer their take.

In 2014, Rio Chenery left New York City for the highlands of Jalisco in Mexico, and after reuniting with longtime friend Jonas Brewer, they set to building their own distillery. Settled within the town of La Estancia, they recruited Master Distiller Juan Ramosand the journey began.

To create Estancia, the distillation process begins by roasting their agave piñas (agave maximiliana ripened for 10 to 15 years) for 2 days within an adobe oven, resulting in the activation of the natural sugars within. The agave piñas are then crushed before being placed in open oak barrels to naturally ferment using wild yeast. Once ready, the resulting liquid (wort) is double distilled within copper alembic stills.

But how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Estancia – 40%

Fresh agave notes upon the nose, with a thin scent of earth and citrus coming through. Slightly sweetened earth notes on the palate, with the agave profile creeping in, followed by juicy pineapple and plum that lingers to the finish.

A great spirit to enjoy on its own, nut equally as good within this adapted cocktail by Wine Mag

raisilla-the-prietoniThe Prietoni

Glass – 

Coupette

Ingredients – 

50 ml Estancia Raicilla
30 ml Campari
30 ml Sweet vermouth
Strip of orange peel, for garnish

Method – 

In a mixing glass, combine all liquid ingredients with ice. Stir well, and strain into a chilled coupe glass. Garnish with orange peel.

There’s a new category hitting the shores of the UK, and it’s versatile, which means that it’s worthy of showing off to your friends and family, especially when the bottles looks pretty cool within your drink cabinet!

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Ungava

ungava
Canada is perhaps not your first choice of country when talking gin. Europe yes, even Oceania and Asia perhaps, but from the UK’s standpoint, whiskey is the tipple most associated with Canada in the likes of Canadian Club and Crown Royal. It’s to a vibrant introduction to my gin experiences then that Ungava comes along, hailing from the northeastern part of the country.

The Ungava name comes from the Ungava Peninsula, which can be found at the northern tip of Quebec within Canada. Ungava is proud to state that its six rare botanicals, native to the Arctic region, form the basis of the gin. These include Nordic Juniper, Arctic Blend, Cloudberry, Crowberry, Labrador Tea and Wild Rose Hips, each handpicked in the wild during the fleeting summer season. Due to the botanicals used, the yellow colour of the gin is completely natural, the result of the plants and berries of the tundra releasing their aromas and colours.

It’s with intrigue then that below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Ungava – 43.1%

Very light and subtle upon the nose, with honeysuckle and soft rose appearing. A developing boldness on the palate, with green berry and fresh herbal notes dominating. A fresh, striking finish.

A good gin to sip over ice, but this signature serve offers a great use for Ungava –

ungava-ungava-beach
Ungava Beach

Glass – 

Old Fashioned

Ingredients –

45 ml Ungava gin
60 ml Coconut water
45 ml Soda
15 ml Simple syrup
1 Grapefruit wedge and 1 grapefruit slice

Method –

Squeeze the grapefruit wedge into an old-fashioned glass. Add ice cubes and then the gin, simple syrup and coconut water. Finish with the soda and garnish with the grapefruit slice.

Canada sure know how to create a spirit, whether whisky or gin! An interesting brand look, but backs itself up with the flavour as Ungava should be reserved a place in your drinks cabinet for sure. Great to mix with too if you’re inviting friends and family round to impress.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Thomas And Evans No.1

Thomas and Evans
A new non-alcoholic brand is on the market, with Thomas and Evans No.1 focusing on the London outlets such as Tom Sellers’ Restaurant Ours. But don’t let the prestige idea put you off, this is one that can be enjoyed by all comers.

The inspiration of Thomas and Evans comes from Mr William Thomas and Mr William Evans, business partners in the 1880’s, and two gentleman who were inspired by the growing temperance movement of the time. They prospered by making drinks to sell in public houses as non-alcoholic alternatives and were renowned for their obsession with quality.

It’s with this that Thomas and Evans was born, using twenty ingredients ranging from silver birch charcoal filtered green fruit juices, to steam-distilled botanicals, including apple, elderflower, citrus peel and oak tincture.

So how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Thomas and Evans No.1 – 0%

Subtle notes of green apple come through the nose, with soft elderflower following. Green apple skin notes on the palate, with soft citrus creating a thin, aromatic finish that lingers.

A good sparkling drink, offering plenty of aromas, and could easily work in one of these –

Thomas and Evans - G T&E
G T&E

G T&E

Glass –

Highball

Ingredients –

25 ml Gin
175 ml Thomas & Evans
4 Cubes of Ice
Slice of Green Apple
Sprig of Rosemary

Method –

Build over ice in a highball glass, top with T&E No. 1, garnish with a thin slice of green apple (ideally cut with a mandolin) and a sprig of rosemary.

Perfect for the humid summer evenings, and can be picked up at Harvey Nichols. Something a little different, but adds a different dimension to your gin for sure!

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Mastiha

Mastiha
When I visited Greece earlier in the year, I cam across a spirit I’ve admittedly heard of, but never really experienced in its true form. Since then, two expressions have come to the UK with fanfare as they look to get the UK embracing its next wave of traditional spirits.

But what is Mastiha?

Mastiha is the use of an essential oil extract from the natural resin of the small evergreen, and rather rare, mastiha tree. Only grown in the southern part of the Greek island of Chios (other variations grow elsewhere, but none produce the special resin needed), Mastiha is used in a wide range of health products over the centuries, but more commonly in the digestif of a mastiha liqueur.

So how do you produce such a digestif?

Due to the trees being looked after by local families, a sense of craftsmanship ensues as each tree is matured for around 50 years. When ready to harvest (or ‘kentos as it is known’) during the warmer summer months, small incisions to the tree trunks and branches are made to allow the resin droplets to be released and seep out, forming translucent golden crystals known as the ‘mastiha tears’. These crystals are then collected, washed in spring water and separated from impurities by hand throughout the winter.

As mentioned, two expressions have hit the UK recently, Enosis and Kentos. Kentos embodies the very special know-how of mastiha production as explained above, whilst Enosis means ‘Union’ and is named after the Chios Mastiha Growers’ Association (or Union of Growers) by the local mastiha experts themselves. The liqueur pays tribute to the tradition, hard work and united spirit of the local agriculturist families.

So how do they fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Enosis – 30%

Slight sharp dryness on the nose, with bark and herbal notes present. Soft, thick viscosity and plenty of sweet mint on the palate, followed by root and cedar wood flavours on the bright, long finish.

Kentos – 20%

Dry notes of sweetened bark, with plenty of root and dried herbal aromas on the nose. A thinner profile on the palate, with a subtle focus on sweeter herbs and liquorice. Subtle notes of oak, with a lingering finish.

Two similar yet distinctively different flavour profiles, both perfect either on its own chilled, or as a base for a signature cocktail.

Enosis - Dry Enosis Martini
Dry Enosis Martini

Dry Enosis Martini

Glass – 

Coupe

Ingredients – 

50 ml Enosis Mastiha liqueur
25 ml Carpano Antica Formula
10 ml Campari
2 dashes Angostura Orange Bitter

Method –

Stir and serve into coupe glass. Decorate with a dried orange wheel

Or perhaps for the more adventurous,

Enosis - United in Tears
United In Tears

United In Tears

Glass – 

Coupe

Ingredients – 

40 ml Enosis Mastiha liqueur
25 ml Tawny Port 10 yrs
15 ml Mazailla Sherry
2 dashes of Angostura Bitters
Twist of Orange

Method – 

Throw the ingredients within a cocktail tin and garnish with orange zest and dehydrated orange wheel.

A really interesting Greek spirit here, that takes a different slant towards what you would normally expect to see from the Mediterranean countries that we’ve grown accustomed to here in the UK. Find a place in your drinks cabinet and offer your friends and family something a little different after your meal.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.