Gold Of Mauritius

Gold of Mauritius

Rum. Associated predominantly with the Caribbean and many of the brands you see today hail from the likes of Jamaica, Barbados and St Lucia. I have featured some of the more lesser known areas such as Argentina and even the UK who produce rum to a worldwide market, but you’d be hard pressed to name such brands off the top of your head. I suppose if you were to remember a liquid clearly, it should stand out, shout and be seen as good quality. I say all this with confidence because the feature for this piece is Gold of Mauritius, a more African venture than Caribbean, but does that really mean we should dismiss it so soon?

This Mauritius rum is produced from the islands own sugar cane plantation, a reliant source for trade in its own right, and aged in re-used port oak barrels. Said to capture ‘the essence of the tropical island with its rich and cultured history’, it gives intrigue to any rum fan. So with this, below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Gold of Mauritius – 40%

Incredibly rich with plenty of wood notes combined with roasted walnuts and high in malt. Very smooth on the palate, with the richness subsiding to become, well just rich! Lots of fresh malt, warm fudge, damp oak and sticky toffee on the palate that produces an incredibly long, warm and mouth-watering finish.

Nothing like the Caribbean styles, this Mauritius based rum is a cracker and one for sipping on its own for sure. Although they do recommend a classic if the mood takes you –

Manhattan
Manhattan

Manhattan

Glass –

Martini

Ingredients – 

40 ml Gold of Mauritius
1 spoon Youngberry syrup
1 spoon Vermouth
1 spoon Sugar Cane syrup
1 drop Angostura bitters

Method –

Take a shaker and fill 1/2 with ice. Add the ingredients over ice, stir and strain into Martini glass.

Although its not one for a storied history, it’s ultimately the liquid that does the talking and I believe it captures it’s tag line of ‘the essence of the tropical island with its rich and cultured history’. The liquid is rich and uses its famous culture to create a dark rum with character. One for the cabinet for sure.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Skipper Tasting Notes

Skipper

There is a rum in the world that is shouting about itself. Skipper proudly states on every bottle, and icon in its own right as it’s the same label as when it first came out in 1930, that it is ‘The Best In This Rum World’. A bold statement perhaps, especially with many more rums coming onto the scene since Skipper’s birth in Guyana.

So what makes Skipper claim such a statement? Well it’s produced in the Diamond distillery (the home of the El Dorado range), and is created using a blend of seven Demerara rums all from Guyana that are aged for at least three years. Oddly though, I found out that it is all blended together in Holland.

Slight oddness aside, how does Skipper fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Skipper – 40%

Lots of treacle on the nose with a slight sweetness following. Rather smooth on the palate with the treacle dominating again, although a hint of cinnamon spice comes through to linger and lengthen the finish.

Not a bad tot, and can just about rival some of the more modern brands that we have around today. Not one for cocktails maybe, but certainly with this –

Rum ‘n’ Coke

Glass –

Highball

Ingredients – 

60ml Skipper Rum
Lime Wedge
Cola

Method – 

Pour rum over ice into highball glass. Squeeze in lime wedge and add to glass. Top with cola.

Simple, and showcases one of the more original and traditional rums on the market. Check it out if you ever come across it in a bar, or indeed grab one for yourself.

Check out the rest of the photos, taken at 24 Bar & Grill, via my Facebook page.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Captain Morgan

Captain Morgan
Now here’s a brand that many of  you will have seen, and probably ordered at some point in your young lives; Captain Morgan’s rum. A stalwart to many, and one of the brands and expressions within that i’m sure many of you start your rum journey with. But how did it get to become so widely acknowledged around the world?

Lets dive into some reasoning and rum.

When Sam Bronfman, President and CEO of Seagram’s drinks company, arrived in the Caribbean in the 1940’s, he was surprised by the opportunities presented by spiced rum. He quickly set about becoming the ‘Rum King of the World’ and established a network of trading relationships with distillers across the region, founding the Captain Morgan Rum Company in 1943. Named after a gentleman named Henry Morgan, born in Wales but left to sail for the West Indies in 1654, he quickly became captain, garnering attention as a legal pirate who defended the British interests. With his exploits, he was knighted and by 1680, Sir Henry Morgan was a plantation owner and Governor of Jamaica. There he lived out his final days until his death in 1688. In 2011 Captain Morgan’s flagship The Satisfaction was discovered by archaeologists off the coast of Panama.

When the company subsequently purchased the Long Pond Distillery in Jamaica, Sam bought an age-old family recipe for spiced rum from the Levy Brothers, two Jamaican pharmacists from Kingston.

Using charred American white oak bourbon barrels, and filled with triple continuous distilled rum, they are rested and matured until ready to be bottled.

So once it hits our glass, how does it fare? Well below I give to you my tasting notes on its two major expressions, plus some flavoured styles recently released –

Captain Morgan Black Label – 40%

Strong vanilla on the nose with a slight spice ending. Both become more dominant on the palate, despite a smooth beginning. Rather harsh on the throat but a long sweet after-taste develops.

Captain Morgan Spiced – 35%

Launched in 1982, a light vanilla nose that carries onto the palate. A slow start but brings a slight raw vanilla flavour with hints of toffee and cassia spice. A rather harsh finish but soon mellows.

Captain Morgan Jack-O Blast – 30%

Limited edition pumpkin spiced rum, essentially pumpkin flavours blended with Captain Morgan Spiced. Light pumpkin aromas on the nose, with subtle spices following. Thick viscosity to begin on the palate, with plenty of ripe pumpkin and cinnamon that creates a warm finish.

Captain Morgan Watermelon Smash – 25%

Limited edition watermelon rum that blends Caribbean rum with watermelon flavours. Ripe watermelon instantly hits the nose, with a very soft note of the rum coming through. Once onto the palate, the rum note comes through a little more, followed by waves of watermelon leading to a sweet yet fresh finish.

All of the above expressions are perfect for mixing simple drinks with too –

Dark & Spicy

Rum and Ginger

Glass –

Highball

Ingredients –

35 ml Captain Morgan Black Label
Ginger Beer

Method – 

Simply add your favourite ginger beer to Captain Morgan and garnish with a slice of lime.

or perhaps;

Captain Morgan - Apple Jack O
Apple Jack-O

Glass – 

Highball

Ingredients – 

50 ml Captain Morgan Jack-O’Blast
115 ml chilled apple cider

Method – 

Combine all ingredients in a glass filled with ice, stir and serve.

Plus you have;

Captain Morgan - Watermelon MojitoWatermelon Mojito

Glass –

Highball

Ingredients –

50 ml Captain Morgan Watermelon Smash
35 ml Captain Morgan White Rum
25ml lime juice
25 ml Simple Syrup
Club soda
Mint leaves

Method –

Middle mint leaves, simple syrup, and lime juice in a highball glass. Add ice, top with club soda and garnish with watermelon and mint leaves.

A great rum for mixing and simple serves, although i know that most rum purists will wish the fact that the spiced expression would hit the required abv mark of 37.5%. One for an easy weekend with friends. The two flavoured expressions are currently only available in the US.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.