Have A Ball With A Monks Maracana

Monks Maracana[1][9]

It’s time for the sporting event of the year, and what better way to celebrate the World Cup than with a Monks Maracana created for Bénédictine by Shaker BarSchool. Enjoy a delicious mix of both spicy yet fruity flavours, inspired by the lively and exciting lifestyle of host city of Rio de Janeiro!

Samba down to muddled limes, fresh passion fruit and the herbal notes of Bénédictine, to create a cocktail that is exciting and passionate, perfect to indulge in during the football madness.

Ingredients:

50 ml Bénédictine
3 Lime wedges
1 large fresh ripe passion fruit
1 spoon castor sugar
Crushed or cracked ice

Garnish:

Lime twist and passion fruit half

Glass:

12oz Rocks

Method:

Muddle limes, squeeze in passion fruit pulp, pour Bénédictine, add crushed ice, churn, top with more ice and garnish!

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Raise A glass To ‘Fruity Muma’ This Mother’s Day With Bénédictine

Make your Mum feel like one-in-a-million this Mother’s Day by whisking her up a Fruity Muma. Created by Shaker and Company especially for Bénédictine, this fruity fizz is an elegant twist on the classic Bellini, and the perfect cocktail indulgence for your Mum.

A blend of sweet, herbal Bénédictine, sublime juicy peach and piquant pineapple flavours topped off with ice-cold Prosecco to lighten and lengthen, Fruity Muma is a dream drink for Mum’s who are fans of fizz with a zing!

It’s also a breeze to make, just follow the simple instructions below:

Ingredients

20ml Benedictine
15ml Peach Puree
15ml Pineapple juice
10ml Lemon Juice
Top with Prosecco

Garnish: Lemon Twist

Glass: Flute

Method

Measure the Bénédictine, peach puree, pineapple juice and lemon juice into a cocktail shaker. Add lots of ice and shake vigorously for 4 seconds. Strain the liquid into a chilled champagne flute then slowly top up the drink with Prosecco, stirring carefully to ensure all the ingredients are properly combined.

Finally, a vibrant lemon twist garnish is sure to make the Fruity Muma appealing to the eye as well as the pallet, but we suggest personalising the experience by topping with her favourite fruit, making your Mum feel special on her special day.

For more cocktail inspiration just visit http://www.in-the-spirit.co.uk

Warm Your Cockles This Christmas With Bénédictine

 

Have a very Merry Christmas this year with Bénédictine liquor’s brand new festive cocktail, ‘Monk’s Punch’, created by Shaker & Company’s mixologist, Tim Garratt.

With the usual mulled wines and spiced spirits making their appearances this winter, Bénédictine, the traditional French liquor, has decided to mix it up with a brand new tipple of its own!
A smooth, warming tipple with a bittersweet edge – this festive flavour combination shows off the herbaceous notes of Bénédictine perfectly. The sweetness of Bénédictine is balanced with the dryness of the Maraschino liqueur and bitterness of the Punt e Mes thus, creating the perfect seasonal serve!

Created using 27 herbs and spices, sourced from around the world, Bénédictine is a versatile cocktail ingredient, which is used in popular recipes such as Singapore Sling and Bobby Burns.

So, before the Christmas guests descend, follow the quick and easy recipe below and give them the perfect winter welcome!

Ingredients:

25 ml Bénédictine
25 ml Hennessy VS
25 ml Punt e Mes
5 ml Luxardo Maraschino
3 drops of Master of Malts Cherry Bitters

Method:

Pour all ingredients into a mixing glass, fill with ice and stir. Be sure to taste regularly to check the balance and strain into a coupette glass. Spray the oils of an orange zest over the top and garnish with either a dehydrated orange wheel or orange twist.

Warm Your Cockles This Christmas With Bénédictine

Have a very Merry Christmas this year with Bénédictine liquor’s brand new festive cocktail, ‘Monk’s Punch’, created by Shaker & Company’s mixologist, Tim Garratt.

With the usual mulled wines and spiced spirits making their appearances this winter, Bénédictine, the traditional French liquor, has decided to mix it up with a brand new tipple of its own!
A smooth, warming tipple with a bittersweet edge – this festive flavour combination shows off the herbaceous notes of Bénédictine perfectly. The sweetness of Bénédictine is balanced with the dryness of the Maraschino liqueur and bitterness of the Punt e Mes thus, creating the perfect seasonal serve!

Created using 27 herbs and spices, sourced from around the world, Bénédictine is a versatile cocktail ingredient, which is used in popular recipes such as Singapore Sling and Bobby Burns.

So, before the Christmas guests descend, follow the quick and easy recipe below and give them the perfect winter welcome!

Monk's Punch
Monk’s Punch

Monk’s Punch

Ingredients –

25 ml Bénédictine
25 ml Hennessy VS
25 ml Punt e Mes
5 ml Luxardo Maraschino
3 drops of Master of Malts Cherry Bitters

Method –

Pour all ingredients into a mixing glass, fill with ice and stir. Be sure to taste regularly to check the balance and strain into a coupette glass. Spray the oils of an orange zest over the top and garnish with either a dehydrated orange wheel or orange twist.

Bénédictine Trip Review

Benedictine

This week I’ve been extremely lucky to be invited along to not one, but two fantastic places within France, courtesy of the French liqueur Bénédictine.

Following on from their nationwide cocktail competitions from the past few weeks, winners from Glasgow, Nottingham, Manchester and London came together, alongside the Bénédictine team and fellow media representative Gary Sharpen of The Cocktail Lovers, to enjoy a three-day trip. With an itinerary that included the likes of a tour of the Bénédictine palace, the distillery itself and a cocktail safari of some of the best bars in Paris, the trip was one that I personally had been looking forward to.

Day 1:

After meeting at St Pancras and hopping on the Eurostar to Calais, a bus ride to Fécamp, the location of Bénédictine, gave us all the first glimpse of France and Normandy. The fishing port of Fécamp was the location for our hotel, and only a five-minute walk through the streets to the stunning Bénédictine palace. Here, we enjoyed a Bénédictine cocktail master class by Frenchman David Tanton of Dou Dou drinks (and resident Bénédictine cocktail creator) in the custom-built bar next to their Winter Garden. Here, he created for us ten cocktails that all included Bénédictine. A highlight for me was the following classic –

Milk and Honey

Milk and Honey
Milk and Honey

Glass – 

Mug

Ingredients – 

30 ml Bénédictine
Cold Milk
1 Orange slice
1 Cinnamon stick

Method – 

Pour Bénédictine into the glass, add ice, and top up with cold milk. This recipe can also be done with soya milk or hot milk. Garnish with orange slice and cinnamon stick.

Another classic he created for us all was the original Sling, as well as the Singapore Sling version, the Bobby Burns and the simplistic Big Ben. This really showed us the versatility of this herbal liqueur, going from adding tonic water or white grapefruit juice, to combining whisky or cognac to create a powerful yet satisfying drink. Of course, plenty of Bénédictine straight or over ice were on offer, including their lesser known B&B (Bénédictine and Brandy) and their Single Cask variety – a spirit that is only available to purchase within the palace itself.

Dinner came straight after the class, with the evening being held within a rather stunning room named the Abbots Hall. Here, a three course meal was prepared for us all, with scallops to start, duck and sweet pear with veg for mains and a variety of cheese for dessert. This also gave us the chance to get to know the rest of the group, including Philippe Jouhaud, the Sales and Marketing Director at Château de Cognac within Bacardi (the owners of Bénédictine) and our guide for the three days. A nightcap of Bénédictine back in the Winter Garden of the palace (an indoor conservatory decked out with chairs, tables and Bénédictine memorabilia) finished off a long but fantastic day.

Day 2:

Our second say began with a walk back to the Bénédictine palace where we were going to be given a tour of both the palace as well as its distillery within. We checked out the history of the Abbey of Fécamp, the birthplace of Bénédictine back in 1510, and were shown some extremely rare artefacts from the palaces archives, including an authenticated signed charter from William The Conqueror. The palace also holds the original still that Alexandre Le Grand used to re-create the recipe in 1863 that Benedictine monk Dom Bernardo Vincelli had created all those years ago. Drapes of its cutting edge advertising techniques were also shown, as well as a large cabinet full of counterfeit bottles of Bénédictine that have been found from all over the world.

Palais de la Bénédictine
Palais de la Bénédictine

Our next port of call came the distillery itself where it takes two years for the creation of the liqueur. Under the watch of the Master Distiller, the mixtures of plants and spices go to make four secret preparations. The process begins by infusing each preparation in super-fine alcohol. Each preparation is then distilled slowly within copper stills, or even double-distilled, depending on the ingredients in it. These initial stages produce four alcoholates, also known as “Esprits”. The four Esprits then age for three months in oak casks. This maturing period allows the essences extracted from the distilled plants and spices to mix together. Once the Esprits have aged separately, they are blended together. This mixture will then rest for eight long months in a large oak barrel. The elaboration process continues with the final blend – honey and an infusion of precious saffron are added. Once added, it is heated to 55°C. The final blend is then aged in large oak barrels for four months. This final ageing process is necessary to put the finishing touch to the subtle balance between the ingredients.

After a quick hit of Bénédictine before we left, we walked down to the sea front for a spot of fresh fish lunch at La Marée (including a Bénédictine filled crème brûlée) before catching the double-decker train (yes, you read that right) to Paris.

With a hotel within the fashion district of Paris and only a two-minute walk from The Louvre, we were ready for our cocktail safari, visiting five of the best that Paris has to offer. With well-known trade representative Marie Delaporte of Bacardi at the helm, she took us to our first bar of the evening, Le Forvm. A gin Martini was my tipple of choice to begin the evening, with the others going for some specially created Bénédictine cocktails or a choice off their cracking menu. Little Red Door was our next port-of-call, with cocktails using the likes of Makers Mark, Mozart chocolate bitters, Campari and Bénédictine on offer. A great venue, with our group situated on the mezzanine level looking over the bar and the famed little red door. A spot of food was the next stage, La Conserverie the host. With some signature Bénédictine cocktails created by the team (a favourite of the night for me which combined Laphroaig, Antica Formula and Fernet Branca) and platters of meat, bread and cheese on offer, it easily sticks in my head as one of the quirkier venues we visited, but a charm that i would love to go back and see again. Soon after, we were on our way to Curio Parlor. A bar complete with stuffed foxes and peacocks adorning the walls, gave us some of their Bénédictine creations. I though was getting ready for our last venue of the evening, Park Hyatt. This 5* hotel boasted some of the most expensive cocktails I’ve come across, but my my were they good. The highlight? La Parisien Cocktail – Bénédictine, rye whisky, Martini Rosso, Peychaud bitters and Ardbeg. To die for!

La Conserverie
La Conserverie

Day 3:

An early start for me as we had a couple of hours to pass the time with a spot of sightseeing of Paris, taking in the Eiffel Tower, Arc de Triomphe and the Avenue des Champs-Élysées. A taxi ride back to Gare du Nord train station to catch the Eurostar started the long journey back to London and Manchester.

Highlights? The Palais de la Bénédictine with the tour of the rooms and the distillery itself. Having dinner within the Abbots Hall will always be remembered, as well as visiting the Paris bars of Le Forvm, Park Hyatt, Little Red Door and La Conserverie. This was the first time I’ve visited France and Paris, so even the sightseeing aspects were a bonus for me.

The trip has given me a greater idea of how versatile Bénédictine is, as well as seeing how well-loved the brand is here in its home country. It’s always  great to put pictures into perspective too, and the chance to see a liqueur distillery (a very different affair compared to your gin or whisky set-ups). A trip I didn’t want to miss, and I’ll happily go back again.

Also, watch out for a great little video that will be hitting the web very soon, courtesy of the guys from MC2tv. I won’t spoil the surprise, but I can safely say it puts a different view on the journey undertaken!

Check out a whole host of photos via my Facebook page of Day 1, Day 2 and Day 3.

Check out my piece on Bénédictine as well as tasting notes for all three of their expressions here.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Bénédictine Crowns Manchester’s Cocktail Champion

Tom Higham, Paul Curry & Amir Javaid - Benedictine Competition (Manchester)

Bénédictine Liqueur has crowned Tom Higham and Amir Javaid as joint winners of the Northern heat of its 2013 Cocktail Challenge in the closest heat of the competition so far.

Tom, from The Liquorists, and Amir, from Room Manchester, both fought off stiff competition from the other skilled entrants in the third heat of the challenge at Epernay Bar in Manchester and took part in a dramatic final shake off as they were awarded joint highest scores by the judges (including my good self).

With the shake off still not able to separate the two contestants, it was decided that both Tom and Amir were equally deserved winners of the once in a lifetime paid trip to France in October, which includes a visit to the liqueur’s birthplace in Fécamp, Normandy and a Cocktail Safari in Paris, all courtesy of Bénédictine.

All the aspiring mixologists were required to create a new cocktail containing a minimum of 35ml Bénédictine, which was then marked on taste, aroma and presentation. The entrants themselves were also judged on their knowledge of the Bénédictine brand, plus the creativity and presentation of their cocktail.

Amir impressed the judges with his chocolate-inspired “The Grand Belle Epoc”, which was created using a mix of Bénédictine, Dark Chocolate Tea, Kings Ginger, Peychaud Bitters, topped with a lemon and mint garnish, and presented with stem ginger coated in dark chocolate accompaniments.

Speaking about the competition, Amir said, “I love using Bénédictine in my cocktails and was interested to see how others use it as an ingredient too. I wanted to be as creative as possible and really challenged myself, so to be named the joint-winner is a great achievement.”

Tom took a different, but equally delicious, steer on his drink of choice, “Eternian Flip”, which was also a big hit with the judging panel. Made using a most enjoyable mix of Bénédictine, Angostura Bitters, Guinness, Coca Lopez and egg yolk, he presented his drink with a Pain du Chocolat, which complemented the sweet flavour of the drink perfectly.

Joint-winner Tom said: “I always enjoy experimenting with new flavours and I had great fun coming up with my drink for today so to win the competition is amazing! The trip in October sounds incredible and I can’t wait to learn more about Bénédictine, by visiting its hometown of Fécamp.”

Paul Curry, brand manager at Bénédictine Liqueur, said: “Once again, the competition has been fantastic, and the quality of both bartenders and cocktails has been excellent. The Northern heat is always a strong competition, but this year was exceptional and we simply couldn’t choose between Amir & Tom’s creations!

“We loved both of the winning cocktails, which made it incredibly difficult for us to choose a winner. Tom and Amir both came up with really imaginative recipes that demonstrate just how versatile Bénédictine can be as a cocktail ingredient.”

Amir and Tom will also be joined on the trip to France by three other regional contestants, from the London, Birmingham and Glasgow heats, which have been taking place throughout September.

Bénédictine Tasting Notes

Benedictine

Bénédictine is a staple for many a bar, and indeed possibly your own collection. It’s also been a well-known brand for over 150 years, and has recently been showing off its versatility within cocktails with a number of cocktail competitions in many major cities. So it makes sense to capitalise on the growing hype and write a bout this French brand, with some intriguing results.

The story of Bénédictine begins in the year 1510 in the Abbey of Fécamp, in Normandy, France. Here, the Benedictine monk, Dom Bernardo Vincelli, created a secret medicinal aromatic herbal beverage which was produced until the Abbey’s devastation in the French Revolution. Fast forward to 1863 and a gentleman named Alexandre Le Grand who was a merchant and collector of religious art, discovered the lost recipe for this elixir in his collection.

The story goes that one day in 1863, Alexandre came across the recipe whilst sorting out some very old family papers and came across an old recipe book that has been tucked away in his library for years. The recipe apparently fell into the hands of his family after the French Revolution of 1789 when the last monk was forced to flee the abbey. He is said to have given a member of Alexandre’s family a number of what he considered to be the most precious books, books that had been kept in the family ever since without arousing the slightest curiosity. The book, a manuscript dated 1510, included nearly 200 pages written in Gothic script by a monk by the name of Vincelli. Despite his knowledge of distillation and spirits, it took Alexandre a year to decipher and unravel the secret of the proportions and mixes of the recipe of 27 different plants and spices. After several attempts, Alexandre Le Grand succeeded in reconstituting Vincelli’s recipe that he carefully transcribed into a book.

Palais de la Bénédictine
Palais de la Bénédictine

Once completed, Alexandre obtained the rights to use the name and the coat of arms of the Benedictine Abbey in Fécamp from the Superior of the Benedictine order in Rome. In tribute to Dom Bernardo Vincelli he called his liqueur Bénédictine. He also chose to keep the indication D.O.M., the motto of the Benedictines standing for Deo Optimo Maximo (God infinitely good, infinitely great). Bénédictine is also distilled and aged in a flamboyant palace, built in Fécamp in tribute to this unique liqueur.

The creation of Bénédictine takes two years. Under the watch of the Master Distiller, the mixtures of plants and spices go to make four secret preparations. The process begins by infusing each preparation in super-fine alcohol. Each preparation is then distilled slowly within copper stills, or even double-distilled, depending on the ingredients in it. These initial stages produce four alcoholates, also known as “Esprits”. The four Esprits then age for three months in oak casks. This maturing period allows the essences extracted from the distilled plants and spices to mix together. Once the Esprits have aged separately, they are blended together. This mixture will then rest for eight long months in a large oak barrel. The elaboration process continues with the final blend – honey and an infusion of precious saffron are added. Once added, it is heated to 55°C. The final blend is then aged in large oak barrels for four months. This final ageing process is necessary to put the finishing touch to the subtle balance between the ingredients.

So how does this 2 year process fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Bénédictine D.O.M. – 40%

Light herbal notes on the nose, with a good dose of sweet honey following. Again light on the palate, with a soft texture with hints of herbs and spice. Fresh bursts but a warmth follows to create a lingering finish.

Bénédictine B&B – 40%

Blend between the strength of an old cognac and the 27 plants and spice. A little sweet and aromatic on the nose with lots of honey notes. A light sweetness on the palate too, with the honey giving off a sharp, short finish.

Bénédictine Single Cask – 43%

Very dry on the nose with bursts of fresh, aromatic spices. A sharp start on the palate, with hints of sweetness that dries out before coming back with a mouth-watering effect. Lots of honey and aromatic herbs blend well together to produce a bold, very long finish.

A cracking liqueur on its own, but like I said, one that is becoming rather versatile –

Milk and Honey
Milk and Honey

Milk and Honey

Glass – 

Mug

Ingredients – 

30 ml Bénédictine
Cold Milk
1 Orange slice
1 Cinnamon stick

Method – 

Pour Bénédictine into the glass, add ice, and top up with cold milk. This recipe can also be done with soya milk or hot milk. Garnish with orange slice and cinnamon stick.

It’s not just the D.O.M. expression available, but also a B & B version which became popular after Ernest Hemingway first mentioned blending Bénédictine & Brandy in his short story ” The Mercenaries ” in 1919. Shortly afterwards, Bénédictine & Brandy became the popular call “B&B“ among fine restaurants and clubs in the USA, so in 1937, the Bénédictine Company decided to produce this new brand.

Worthy of inclusion within your drinks cabinet, and a great after dinner treat in your favourite restaurant.

Check out my review of the Bénédictine trip undertaken in October 2013.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Australasia Review

Australasia - Smokey Old Fashioned

If you’ve ever ventured into the Spinningfield’s area of Manchester you’ll notice many a bar and restaurant serving businessmen, ladies who lunch or myself propping the bar up as I dive through the drinks menu. One such time happened last week, at a rather well-known yet unknown venue named Australasia. I say unknown due to its rather unique entrance – a triangle shard of glass sticking out of the ground with a door leading to a staircase. I remember I use to pass without realising it was there, and bewildered when it first opened of where this place was. Now I’m familiar, and after a chance meeting with the venues new BDM Gill Andrews and Bar Manager Jenny (of the Hilton’s Cloud 23 fame), I can report back to you all with wonderful memories.

As mentioned, I’ve been here before and have always kicked myself for not coming back many a time since, but with whispers of their new cocktail menu arriving shortly, coupled with food and wine menu revamp too, Australasia is breathing new life into their underground den. The drinks menu itself is simple, no descriptions, just names only. Daring but it works because the bartenders have to work to sell you a drink. You feel looked after knowing that the gentleman or lady behind the bar actually knows their stuff, the ingredients within and why you will love each and every one of them.

Oh, and also how to make them consistent.

Round The Twist
Round The Twist

For example, the Smokey Old Fashioned. A base of Woodford Reserve coupled with maple syrup and bitters over an ice ball. Smoke, courtesy of oak chips via a chemical flask, adds the sense of magic to the drink, as well as aromas which linger even when the smoke has cleared. Fantastic, and I’ve only ever had them from their fellow Alchemist. Consistency really is the key for these kind of places.

A couple of other new delights to wet your appetite over the next few months include Bushfire and Alice Spring Punch. Bushfire has the combination of Grey Goose Citroen, Benedictine, fresh grapefruit, lemon juice and sugar syrup with a good sprig of thyme soaked in Sunset Very Strong Rum and lit. Slightly sour for my liking as I’m a man with a sweet tooth, but the freshness made this a winner for me. The herbal Benedictine and grapefruit mix well with the citrus flavours, and the hint of the Sunset rum gives it a slight kick if sipped. Alice Spring Punch blended Russian Standard vodka with lychee purée Briottet lychee liqueur, Monin Hibiscus, fresh lemon and topped with Australian ‘Champagne’. A lovely tangy hit from the Australasian ‘Champagne’, with the hibiscus and lemon punching well against the double dose of lychee and vodka. Fantastic lingering sweetness too.

The highlight of my visit for me personally came in the form of a short drink named Round The Twist. Using Russian Standard vodka, stem ginger purée  fresh lychee, lime juice and velvet falernum, it created a well-balanced, mouth-watering drink that offered freshness with a lingering velvet and lychee flavour.

So the above gives a good idea of what to expect from the Australasia team, but of course some of the staples have been kept including the Pineapple and Jasmin Daiquiri, Ladyboy Martini and The Australian Porn Star (£7.95 each). Coupled with a menu that includes wine, both Champagne and sparkling wines from Australia, New Zealand and England and a good offering of seven Sake to go with your oysters, sushi and tempura delights, Australasia really does cover all the basis that you expect.

As mentioned, new menus are coming out, I’d book yourself in before you miss them.

Check out more photos via my Facebook page.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.