Ardbeg Tasting Notes

Ardbeg

Ardbeg is another name in the whisky world that I have encountered on many occasion, and since we’ve just had Ardbog day (1st June), it makes sense to combine my experiences into one place and discover why Ardbeg won World’s Best Whisky for three years running.

Ardbeg, from the Scottish Gaelic: Àrd Beag, meaning Little Height, is found within a small cove off the south coast of Islay, its home since 1815. A gentleman named John McDougall founded the distillery until handing it over to Thomas Buchanan in 1838, who was a Glasgow spirit merchant, for £1,800. John’s son Alexander continued to manage the operations though until his death in 1853 where the company was then ran by Colin Hay and McDougall’s sisters Margaret and Flora (quite possibly becoming Scotland’s first female distillers). By the early 20th Century, Ardbeg trademarked its name and its distinctive letter ‘A’ after hearing that they are the most productive distillery on Islay.

An uncertain future came during the 20th Century where The Alexander McDougall & Co. Ltd purchased Ardbeg for £19,000 in 1922 before being bought by Ardbeg Distillery Ltd in 1959 and then Hiram Walker in 1977. Unfortunately, Ardbeg stopped production and closed its doors in 1981. Hope came in the form of Allied Lyons purchasing Hiram Walker, but ultimately closed again in 1991. Six years later, the Glenmorangie company purchased the distillery and in less than a year it was voted Distillery of the Year and producing 600,000 litres a year by 1999.

Ardbeg came full circle by winning Jim Murray’s World’s Best Whisky award in 2008 for it’s 10 year-old expression, before again winning in 2009 with Uigeadail and 2010 with Supernova.

So how does Ardbeg come about?

Ardbeg uses water from Loch Uigeadail located three miles away behind the distillery, as well as malt from Port Ellen. Ardbeg are also one of the very few that use a Boby Mill to crush their malt into grist. Boby Mills are extremely rare within the whisky industry and are more commonly found within breweries. After being distilled twice, Ardbeg uses commonly ex-bourbon casks but sherry butts and new French oak barrels are also selected for different expressions.
For a more detailed look into the production method, check out this nifty page.

As mentioned, I’ve been lucky enough to try some of the Ardbeg range, so with this, below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Ardbeg 10yr – 46%

On the nose, a subtle hint of peat mixes with light hits of smoke. Lemon and limes are also swirling slowly. The palate enjoys light, fresh combinations of cinnamon, lemons and limes with a hint of iodine.

Ardbeg Uigeadail – 54.2%

A smooth, mellow hint of peat with honey and sugar mixing well on the nose. However the palate has a sharp peat hit mixing with winter spices that mellows quickly to produce a rather short after-taste.

Ardbeg Corryvreckan – 57%

Light, peat iodine notes with lots of herbs and blackcurrant combining well on the nose. A soft blend of cream and spices start well initially, but develops into a rather harsh dance of salt and iodine for a short after-taste.

As you can imagine, Ardbeg isn’t one for cocktails, however it’s not too bad when it comes to being used within a garnish * –

Old Quartermaster
Old Quartermaster

Old Quartermaster

Glass – 

Coupet

Ingredients – 

30 ml Mt. Gay Eclipse Black rum
22.5 ml Famous Grouse scotch whisky
15 ml Pedro Ximenez sherry
4 drops Ardbeg as garnish
1 orange twist, as garnish

Method – 

Stir over ice and strain into a small chilled cocktail glass or coupe. Add the garnish so that each drop represents a point of a compass. Squeeze the twist over the drink, then discard.

Well worth a try if your ever in a bar that stocks the Ardbeg range. Or of course stock up at home, you need to raise a late glass to what is turning into an annual Ardbeg day anyway!

* Recipe courtesy of Gaz Regan.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Glenmorangie Tasting Notes

Glenmorangie

Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy. A name of fashion, perfume and of course Champagne. With names like Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot and Moët & Chandon, it’s sometimes forgetful to remember that of course the cognac Hennessy is part of their glamorous portfolio. Champagne and wine outnumbers the spirits in the LVMH drink range, but they have some well-known names in their including Belvedere, 10 Cane, Ardbeg and Glenmorangie. After covering the first two, it only makes sense to take a look at the whisky that has been around since 1843, Glenmorangie.

It is said that the production of alcohol started at Morangie Farm in Tain, Ross-shire in 1738, when a brewery was built that shared the farm’s water source, the Tarlogie Spring. A former distillery manager, William Matheson, formerly part-owner of Balblair Distillery, and his brother John applied for a license, acquired the farm in 1843 and converted the Morangie brewery to a distillery, equipped with two second-hand gin stills. He later renamed the distillery Glenmorangie. The distillery was purchased by its main customer, the Leith firm Macdonald and Muir, in 1918, with the Macdonald family retaining control of the company for almost 90 years.

Glenmorangie, like all distilleries and breweries in Britain, suffered terribly between 1920 and 1950, with prohibition and then the Great Depression in the United States reducing whisky sales and the distillery was effectively mothballed between 1931 and 1936. The depression ended with World War II, but the war effort left fuel and barley in short supply and the distillery was again mothballed between 1941 and 1944. Towards the end of the war and in the immediate post war period, the distillery increased production and was running at full capacity by 1948 with the number of stills was increased from two to four during 1977. Water supply became a concern during the 1980’s with development of the land around the Tarlogie Springs becoming more likely. This development could have reduced the quality and quantity of water available to the distillery, so the decision was made by Macdonald and Muir to purchase around 600 acres of land around and including the Tarlogie Springs to guarantee the quality and quantity of water. The distillery once again engaged in expansion during 1990 when it added a further four stills, and two additional fermentation vessels during 2002. Four new stills were added in 2009, bringing the total to twelve.

The Macdonald family retained ownership of 52% of the company through a complicated London stock exchange listing which saw the family hold the majority of the voting shares of the company. The family sold the company in 2004 for around £300 million to  Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy.
Following the acquisition, Tayburn design agency were appointed to redesign Glenmorangie as part of a brand overhaul. This included the introduction of a new, more curvacious bottle, and the renaming of some of its variants. Its Wood Finish whiskies were given new names such as The Quinta Ruban, Nectar d’Or and LaSanta, which were also advertised as non chill-filtered for the first time. Glenmorangie has been the best-selling single malt in Scotland almost continuously since 1983, and produces around 10 million bottles per annum, of which 6 to 6.5 million are sold in the UK. Globally, Glenmorangie has a 6% share of the single malt market.

So how does Glenmorangie all come about then?

Using water from the Tarlogie Spring and barley grain from farmers in the area, the resulting fermentation is distilled using the tallest stills in Scotland standing at 26 ft 3 in (8 metres) tall with 16 ft 10.25 in (just over 5 metres) necks. The distillation process is undertaken by a staff of 16 known as The Sixteen Men of Tain. Once distilled, the use of different cask types create the varied range that Glenmorangie have to offer. All products are matured within white oak casks which are manufactured from trees growing in Glenmorangie’s own forest in the Ozark Mountains of Missouri, United States. These new casks are left to air for two years before being leased to distillers Jack Daniel’s and Heaven Hill for them to mature bourbon in for four years. Glenmorangie then uses their barrels to mature their spirit.

The Original range will mature entirely in ex-bourbon casks, while the Extra Matured range of bottlings are transferred into casks that were previously used to mature other products such as wine, port or sherry in a process called finishing. These form part of the regular range of products Glenmorangie produces. Glenmorangie also obtains small batches of other casks for finishing and release limited edition bottlings from these. Following acquisition by LMVH, Glenmorangie produced a rare limited edition aged in casks previously used to mature Château Margaux. The warehouses in which the casks are stored are also believed to affect the taste of the whisky. Glenmorangie have released a special edition bottling, titled Cellar 13 which is from the warehouse closest to the sea, as the whisky is believed to have a distinctive flavour.

Bottling of Glenmorangie  takes place at The Glenmorangie Company’s purpose-built bottling plant in The Alba Campus at Livingston, West Lothian, just outside Edinburgh, Scotland.

Bottling a 13 strong portfolio is an impressive feat, and I’ve been lucky enough to try some of their expressions. Below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Glenmorangie Original – 40%

A 10yr malt. Instant citrus on the nose but is soon followed by vanilla. Vanilla is also present on the palate before bursting with fruit near the end, noticeable orange.

Glenmorangie Nectar D’or – 46%

Sauternes cask finished. Sweet, rich vanilla notes dominate the nose with slight hints of toffee wandering soon after. The palate enjoys a slow build-up of spice, ginger and red berry that creates a warmth that lingers playfully long after.

Glenmorangie Lasanta – 46%

Spends ten years maturing in American white oak ex-bourbon casks before being extra-matured for a further two years in Oloroso Sherry casks from Jerez in Spain. Wild spice with lots of dry oak flavours mix well on the nose, with a smooth yet heavier flavour of sherry and nuts on the palate. Subtle orange hints on the after-taste.

Glenmorangie Quinta Ruban – 46%

Spends 10 years maturing in American white oak casks, before being transferred into specially selected ruby port pipes from the Quintas or wine estates of Portugal. The nose  is light with a sharp mint flavour hitting the senses. with a slight spice nearing the end. The palate has a combination of dark chocolate and fresh mint, that mellows out to become a lot smoother after a few sips. Hints of orange are also detected throughout.

Glenmorangie Ealanta – 46%

Part of the Private Edition range. Fully matured in specially sourced, heavily toasted new white oak casks from Missouri’s Ozark mountains. Fresh with soft orange peel on the nose. Rather light on the palate with sweet oak present, but it develops a lingering spice with hints of corn following.

With other expressions such as Astar, 18yr and 25yr, there are still plenty for me to try, and for yourselves to experience. The Glenmorangie range is not one to be sniffed at, as LVMH realised when they decided to purchase. For a company like that, they know when they see something good. Only the best quality get selected within their spirit ranks.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Manchester Whisky Festival 2012 Review

The Palace Hotel in Manchester was the host of the biggest whisky festival outside of London, so big in fact that there had to be two sessions and two floors. The Whisky Lounge were the proud organisers for the 4th year in a row and had on offer the crème de la crème of the whisky world from both Scotland and Ireland, and even threw in Japan, England and America for good measure. Part of the Manchester Food & Drink Festival, there would be a host of seminars and masterclasses on offer including The Magnificent Seven, hosted by Colin Dunn of Diageo, which took you through an in-depth look into their varied portfolio. Joe Clark of The Whisky Lounge also offered his advice for novices of whisky festivals and helped pave the way of how to get the most out of the drams on offer. To cap the morning session off, Ryan Williams of Buffalo Trace was to be on hand to guide enthusiasts through the award-winning distillery and their delights. This year I myself didn’t participate in any of the workshops on offer, but took full advantage of scanning the list for new additions, rare offerings and old favourites – including a rum from the guys at Berry Bros and Rudd.

Below, in order I sampled, I give to you my tasting notes on the mornings offerings –

Auchentoshan Valinch – 57.5%

The Classic at cask strength. Floral and very clean on the nose with a sweet maltness and a creamy flavour on the palate. Lingering finish. Smoother with drops of water with a slight power kick at the end.

Suntory Yamazaki 12yr – 43%

Light on the nose with aromas of honey, vanilla and peach. Becomes a little sweeter on the palate with spice lingering and a long finish.

Bowmore Tempest Batch No. 3 –55.6%

Very dry on the nose with a balanced mix of peat and smoke. Still rather dry once it hits the palate, but develops flavours of lemon and salt with a peppery finish.

Hazelburn 12yr – 46%

Bold with lots of dry fruits on the nose with hints of sherry lingering near the end. Rather spicy on the palate with a rich oak flavour and hints of chocolate on the long finish.

Old Pulteney 12yr – 40%

Rather dry on the nose with aromas of fruit and vanilla slowly making an appearance. Again quite dry on the palate, with hints of salt and smoke initially and becomes rather bitter at the end.

Elmer T. Lee – 45%

On the nose, a very light offering of vanilla and butterscotch creates a smooth, soft and slightly sweet aroma. A sweeter taste of honey and vanilla with some intense fruits on the palate creates a rather creamier bourbon to almost class it as a dessert wine.

Hancock’s President Reserve 44.45%

Instant sweetness on the nose with aromas of exotic fruits that carries onto the palate. A round offering of fruit, spice and honey combine well to create a long finish.

Rock Hill Farms Single Barrel 50%

Lots of oak and dry spices on the nose with a good balance of toffee, chocolate, vanilla and toffee on the palate. Incredibly long.

English Whisky Company Chapter 6 Un-peated – 46%

Sweet but soft on the nose with aromas of vanilla. Very sweet as it hits the palate with lots of malt and spice bursting well. Mellows as it nears the end with a slight dryness.

Singleton 12yr – 40%

Very rich fruit and nut aromas blend well when it hits the nose, with an initial sweetness onto the palate. Rather smooth afterwards however with a slight coffee flavour.

Dalwhinnie 15yr – 43%

Deep soft honey nose countered by a sharp citrus end on the nose. Quite sweet on the palate but does soften with vanilla.

Aberlour 16yr – 43%

Dry but rich on the nose with spice and raisins dominating. Quite sweet on the palate with a soft plum and long oak finish.

Aberlour a’Bunadh Batch 41 – 59%

Lots of spice and rich orange combine well on the nose and continue on to the palate with ginger and chocolate flavours coming through. A bitter oak and sherry end.

Scapa 16yr – 40%

On the nose there’s lots of sweet honey aromas which move onto the palate and combine with ginger to create a rich and long-lasting finish.

Berry’s XO Caribbean Rum – 46%

Banana, caramel and liquorice dominate the nose with a potent richness. Green fruits offer an intense sweetness on the palate but becomes rather dry at the end.

Compass Box Flaming Heart  – 48.9%

A bold nose of smoke and peat but mellows quickly. A good combination of citrus and vanilla on the palate with a dry spice and smoke ending.

Compass Box The Entertainer –

Light on the nose with peat aromas noticeable and a whisp of soft corn. Rather sharp on the palate however with a slight kick of spice with makes your mouth water every time.

Glenmorangie Original – 40%

Instant citrus on the nose but is soon followed by vanilla. Vanilla is also present on the palate before bursting with fruit near the end, noticeable orange.

Greenore 8yr – 40%

The nose enjoys delicate citrus notes with a slight mix of corn. As it hits the tongue, it gives a short, sharp hit but mellows quickly into a more distinctive citrus taste with a hint of barley coming through.

The Balvenie Caribbean Cask – 43%

Lots of vanilla notes on the nose, with rich toffee and fruit combining well on the palate. Hints of dried spice and tropical fruit help to round the long finish off.

W. L. Weller 12yr – 45%

Soft on the nose with hints of vanilla. A very soft, creamy flavour of wheat on the palate gives this a long, grainy finish that has hints of sweetness.

Arran 10yr – 46%

Instant vanilla to begin with, but tropical fruits follow. A spice start with citrus and oak counterbalancing nicely. Long and mellow ending.

Arran Gold Cream Liqueur – 17%

Soft toffee notes on the nose mix with a slight aroma of fruit. Lots of vanilla on the palate creates a sweet offering, with chocolate dominating near the end.

Glenfiddich Rich Oak – 40%

Soft fruit notes on the nose with slight oak whispers. Rather soft and short on the palate, but a fruity offering with rich vanilla thrown in.

Glenfiddich Age of Discovery 19yo Madeira Cask Finish – 40%

Deep orange notes on the nose with some hints of grape slowly released. Spice immediately hits the palate, but mellows to a smooth offering of caramel and ginger.

Glenfiddich 21yr – 40%

Strong and intense banana and toffee aroma with hints of leather and a rich sweet follow-through on the nose. Smooth with a slight smokiness and ginger and lime extracts on the palate with a long warm after-taste with subtle spice hints.

Glenfiddich 15yr Non-chill Filtered – 51%

Ripe, fresh fruit on the nose with an aroma of pepper at the end. Rather dry on the palate with spice, rich fruit flavours creating a long finish.

As you can see, a rather diverse collection was available, as well as varieties that are already gracing the site including Ardbeg, Connemara and anCnoc. With a total of four hours per session, there’s more than enough to keep you busy, and the guys and girls behind the brands are more than willing to tell you everything you need to know.

I know for a fact I’ll be attending next years festival as it’s the perfect chance to try some whiskies that you may never be able to afford in a bar or restaurant, plus a great opportunity to sample some you may never thought you would like.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Moet & Hennessy Whisky Tasting at Kro 2

It’s been that time of month again at Kro 2 with their monthly whisky tasting and this time Moet and Hennessy were the guests, bringing with them Glenmorangie and Ardbeg.

Again for those of you who don’t know what Kro Bar is, they’re a Danish family business who specialise in Danish food and beer. A popular idea in the Manchester area, they’ve expanded from 1 outlet to 5 in the space of 10 years.

Our host for the evening was Alex, and he took us through a thorough history of Moet and Hennessy itself and the whiskies they have under their portfolio.

Now I’ve personally never tried any of the Glenmorangie range, but i had the chance to sample Ardbeg at this years Manchester Whisky Festival a few months back. So with a rough idea of what my taste-buds would be expecting, below are my tasting notes on each whisky offered to us:-

The range of Glenmorangie on offer

Glenmorangie Nectar D’or – 46%

A multi-award winning Single Malt, sweet, rich vanilla notes dominate the nose with slight hints of toffee wandering soon after. The palate enjoys a slow build-up of spice, ginger and red berry that creates a warmth that lingers playfully long after.

Glenmorangie Lasanta – 46%

Another award-winning Single Malt, the Lasanta spends ten years maturing in American white oak ex-bourbon casks before being extra-matured for a further two years in Oloroso Sherry casks from Jerez in Spain.
Wild spice with lots of dry oak flavours mix well on the nose, with a smooth yet heavier flavour of sherry and nuts on the palate. Subtle orange hints on the after-taste.

Glenmorangie Quinta Ruban – 46%

Again award-winning, the Quinta Ruban spends 10 years maturing in American white oak casks, before being transferred into specially selected ruby port pipes from the Quintas or wine estates of Portugal. 
The nose  is light with a sharp mint flavour hitting the senses. with a slight spice nearing the end. The palate has a combination of dark chocolate and fresh mint, that mellows out to become a lot smoother after a few sips. Hints of orange are also detected throughout.

Glenmorangie Original (not tasted) & Ardbeg 10yr

Ardbeg 10yr – 46%

On the nose, a subtle hint of peat mixes with light hits of smoke. Lemon and limes are also swirling slowly. The palate enjoys light, fresh combinations of cinnamon, lemons and limes with a hint of iodine. It’s not as strong hitting as you may expect.

Ardbeg Uigeadail – 54.2%

A smooth, mellow hint of peat with honey and sugar mixing well on the nose. However the palate has a sharp peat hit mixing with winter spices that mellows quickly to produce a rather short after-taste.

Ardbeg Corryvreckan – 57%

Light, peat iodine notes with lots of herbs and blackcurrant combining well on the nose. A soft blend of cream and spices start well initially, but develops into a rather harsh dance of salt and iodine for a short after-taste.

Traditional Fish Pie

To compliment the whisky selection, the Head Chef at Kro 2 created a traditional Scottish fish pie involving haddock, cod and pollock, mixed with peas in a white wine sauce, topped with cheese and mash potato.

 

Another thoroughly enjoyable event in which we were able to sample a good range of two award-winning whiskies. Personal highlights were the Glenmorangie Nectar D’or and the Ardbeg 10yr.

Next month’s Kro 2 whisky tasting is yet to be announced, but expect to see advertising for it here as soon as details are released.

 

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

Whisky Tasting at Kro 2

Coming soon is the fourth whisky tasting event to be held at Kro 2 on Manchester’s Oxford Road.

Following last month’s successful visit from Maxxium Brands (click here for the review) they now welcome Moet & Hennessy Distillery to the table to present their portfolio of Scotch whisky delights.

Their range will include –

– Glenmorangie Lasanta
– Glenmorangie Quinta Ruben
– Glenmorangie Nectar D’or
– Ardbeg 10yr
– Ardbeg Uigeadail
– Ardber Corryvreckan

Kro 2 will also have their head chef create a dish to compliment the whiskies on offer!

This must-go-to event will take place Wednesday 7th December from 7.30pm and will cost £20 per head.

For further details and to purchase tickets, you can either swing by Kro 2, give them a call on 0161 236 1048 or visit their website at http://www.kro.co.uk/kro-two

See you there!

Maxxium Whisky Tasting at Kro 2

It’s been that time of month again at Kro 2 with their monthly whisky tasting and this time incorporating the whiskies of Maxxium.

Again for those of you who don’t know what Kro Bar is, they’re a Danish family business who specialise in Danish food and beer. A popular idea in the Manchester area, they’ve expanded from 1 outlet to 5 in the space of 10 years.

Our host for the evening was Mike Green, the Brand Development Manager of Maxxium, and he took us through a thorough history of Maxxium itself as well as the whiskies they have under their portfolio. These included –

– Ardmore Traditional Cask
– Highland Park 12yr
– Macallan 10yr Fine Oak
– Glenrothes Select Reserve
– Laphroaig 10yr
– Snow Grouse
– Highland Park 18yr

Now I’ve personally never tried any of these whiskies before apart from Laphroaig 10yr, and i encountered Maxxium at the London Cocktail Week a few weeks back (click here for my review on Stolichnaya). Maxxium themselves are responsible for the sales, local marketing and distribution of many of the world’s leading premium spirits and wine brands including Jim Beam, Courvoisier, Bols and Makers Mark. The company is owned by two equal shareholders: BEAM Inc and The Edrington Group.

Back to the night, below are my tasting notes on each whisky offered to us:-

Snow Grouse – 40%

Served chilled. Smooth on the nose with a fragrant aroma of vanilla coming through near the end. On the palate, a sharp, slightly harsh flavour of vanilla with an almost tequila like taste lingering around giving a warm after-taste.

Glenrothes Select Reserve – 43%

Slightly peaty on the nose with hints of citrus lemons and limes blending their way through. A smooth, slighlty velvety taste on the palate, with vanilla and barley subtly making an appearance near the end. A slight malt burn on the after-taste but an easy drinker non-the-less.

Macallan Fine Oak 10yr – 40%

On then nose, smooth vanilla produces a slight sweetness aroma that becomes enthasised on the palate, although the flavour is rather short. A blend of walnut and butter mix well but result in very little after-taste. Short offering, but a great choice!

Highland Park 12yr – 40%

Slight peatyness on the nose with subtle aromas of honey and citrus fruits to give a well-balanced flavour. On the palate, it’s clean, almost breathless with a light texture. A low spice on the after-taste with a slight sweetness if you add a dash of water.

Ardmore Traditional Cask – 46%

Lots of caramel on the nose, with a slight peat aroma making its way through near the end. Sweet palate offering with a slightly peaty burn on the tongue. Some caramal and vanilla flavours mixing well too.

Laphroaig 10yr – 40%

Smoky peat instantly hits your nose, with sea salt following soon after. Iodine aromas flowing slowly near the end. The palate enjoys a smoky smooth vanilla with oak flavours resulting in a long after-taste with a hint of spice near the end.

Highland Park 18yr – 43%

Lots of toffee sweetness on the nose with some fresh fruit aromas subtly overtaking near the end. The palate encounters a very smooth blend of cinnamon and toffee with a citrus end resulting in a very mild offering with a slight sweetness.

Mid-way through the tastings, Kro supplied us with a delicious dish named Cullen Skink. A mix of smoked Scottish Haddock, potato and onion served with fresh oven baked seeded bread rolls. Delicious!

Another thoroughly enjoyable event in which we were able to sample a good range of whatMaxxium have to offer. Personal highlights were the Highland Park 18yr and Macallan 10yr, hopefully two items I’ll be picking up to add to my collection soon! Special thanks to Mike Green who displayed a great amount of knowledge of the whiskies on offer, and hopefully I’ll get to see both himself and Maxxium in the near future with their wide range in their portfolio.

Next month’s Kro 2 whisky tasting will be hosted by Moet & Hennessy Distillery. On offer will be –

– Glenmorangie Lasanta
– Glenmorangie Quinta Ruben
– Glenmorangie Nectar D’or
– Ardbeg 10yr
– Ardbeg Uigeadail
– Ardber Corryvreckan

Check out Kro’s website here – http://www.kro.co.uk/

Take a look at Maxxium Brands website here – http://www.maxxium.co.uk/

You can purchase the above whiskies here – http://www.masterofmalt.com/whiskies

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.