Emily Says . . . . ‘Flor De Sevilla’

tanquerayIn her twelfth feature under ‘Emily Says . . .’, the voice to the Manchester bar scene in Emily Puckering looks at Ginuary over Dry January;

The New Year is well and truly upon us, and a new year usually means one thing: Dry January. But I’m not here to talk about that nonsense! I’m here to talk about “Ginuary”, and what gins have appeared under my radar so far this month.

With Tanqueray being one of the most popular London Dry Gins known, the arrival of Tanqueray Flor De Sevilla has caught not only my attention, but the attention of the bartending community. But firstly, what exactly is Tanqueray all about?

Founded by Charles Tanqueray in 1830 in Bloomsbury, London, Tanqueray still holds the original recipe that has stood the test of almost one hundred and eighty years. The distillery, however, was severely damaged during World War Two in 1941. The only surviving piece of equipment was one of the stills that was nicknamed “Old Tom”, and made the move with them to the new and current distillery in Cameron Bridge, Scotland.

The story of Tanqueray Flor De Sevilla begins in Spain’s sun-drenched Seville, a place brimming with fresh and beautiful flavours; including its vastly growing gin market. Traditionally, the recipe follows the original that is used for Tanqueray London Dry, but involves a beautiful blend of sevilla orange essences and other fine botanicals, including classics such as juniper and angelica root, all of which are distilled four times over.

On the nose, the zesty aromas of the sevilla oranges dominate the first initial smell. A sweet and fragrant aroma that connotes a warm summers evening; something that we all need in this frosty month!

With an ABV of 41.3%, Flor De Sevilla delivers the perfect zesty balance of classic Tanqueray on the palate, with the delightfully predictable notes of sevilla orange. Whilst this gin remains citrus heavy, fresh and floral notes are present, creating a long and fruity finish.

This citrusy little number is perfect served as a 50ml double over ice with an Indian tonic water. In terms of garnish, there’s no need to go over-board for this one. A simple wedge of orange will do just nicely… not forgetting to squeeze over the finishing product! A personal favourite at the moment, Tanq’s Flor De Sevilla is a ‘must try’ in 2019.

Photo Cred: Tanqueray

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Fever Tree With The Ultimate Gin And Tonic Tour

Fever Tree

Gin and tonic. One of the most easily recognisable drinks in the world, and very easy to replicate. Made at home, at your favourite bar, by your mum, gran, bartender or waiter, there’s nothing you could do wrong with the creation of a gin and tonic.

Or is there?

Fever Tree, a brand that has made head-way in the tonic category, have organised an enlightening tour of three cities here in the UK. Bristol, Glasgow and my own home town of Manchester are the settings for what they have dubbed as ‘The Ultimate Gin and Tonic Tour’, and aim to divulge into the depths of the tonic category, and how we came to know what will be in your hand for most of the evening; the G&T.

Craig Harper talks you through the world of tonic
Craig Harper talks you through the world of tonic

The tours are consumer focused, bringing the gin lovers, novices and haters together for an informal chat in some fantastic locations, and yours truly had the opportunity to sneak peek at what would be involved, with a session hosted by Craig Harper, the face of Fever Tree and gin legend within the category, with help from David Barber, the northern representative for Fever Tree and ex Caorunn gin brand ambassador, and Jamie Jones, who in 2013 was crowned Global Gin Connoisseur by G’Vine.

If you’re looking to hit the Manchester trail, The Rosylee Tearooms in Stevenson Square brings together your first tonic and gin combination; Tanqueray with the classic Fever Tree Indian Tonic. Whilst being given the chance to pour your own bottle of tonic over your gin to your liking, Craig walks through what tonic actually is, and how the likes of malaria, World Wars and fluorescent lights have impacted our views on tonic water and what we perceive it as. Don’t let those three words fool you though as Craig explains how we come to the more well-known brands seen today, and ultimately Fever Tree itself, with interesting demos on an original gin and tonic recipe, and the bottles used before the capped varieties we are used to these days.

Cane and Grain in Manchester’s Northern Quarter offers a speakeasy styled bar that is perfect for another gin and tonic, this time being Portobello Road. Jamie gives some fantastic insight into the brand itself, the category of gin and the timeline that has given us some highs and lows, including the famed ‘Gin Lane’ and the rise of the latest ‘gin craze’. Comparisons between tonic waters, especially the Indian styles and lighter versions, are also explored, an experiment rarely done at home I can imagine, and gives a different view on the styles available, with Craig explaining why the market for tonic waters is growing as the palates of consumers is changing.

Fever Tree Elderflower and Bloom
Fever Tree Elderflower and Bloom

Lastly, Mr Cooper’s House and Garden takes the gin category to the ‘New Western’, and gives Jamie a chance to explain the new craze that has given us the likes of Bloom, Monkey 47, Tanqueray 10 and Gin Mare. It also though, highlights the need for the perfect garnish and how gaining the right ingredient can make all the difference to your gin and tonic experience. Blending the likes of Bloom with Fever Tree Elderflower tonic offers a lighter experience than the Indian tonic would do, giving the botanicals within Bloom (chamomile, honeysuckle and pomelo are within amongst others) a fighting chance to tantalize, instead of being cut down to size and perhaps not giving the full impression you would expect. Or how about Gin Mare, that comes garnished with a sprig of thyme? Perfectly compliments the basil and rosemary for example, and accentuates the thyme botanical within the gin itself.

Essentially, Fever Tree are looking to break down the gin and tonic, explaining the origins, the flavours and aromas, whilst giving insight into the many gins available, and the perfect Fever Tree and garnish to accompany. Why would you want to miss out?!

Grab your tickets here!

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Diageo Still Popping Up At The Edinburgh Fringe

Get yourself to Edinburgh and check out a whole host of pop-up bars from Diageo –

tanqerayTanqueray Secret Garden

56 North, Tanqueray Gin and Diageo World Class are delighted to present the “Secret Garden”. Located behind the home of Scottish Gin at 56 North this previously unused space is being transformed into a summer garden for the Fringe Festival 2014. Be sure to try the Tanqueray No.TEN Grapefruit & Chamomile Fizz.

don julioDon Julio at Festival Square

Make sure you visit the Don Julio hut in the heart of the festival, Festival Square and grab a Don Julio frozen margarita before you shoot off to see a show.

zacapaThe Zacapa Experience at Chaophraya

Situated at exactly 23 metres above street level is ‘The Zacapa Experience’ at Chaophraya with unparalleled views over Edinburgh’s famous George Street. The must have drink here is the Zacapa 23 vanilla and banana smoked pina colada, best enjoyed with sunshine.

johnnie walkerJohnnie Walker at Harvey Nichols

The Harvey Nichols rooftop terrace has had a makeover and transformed into a Johnnie Walker experience complete with a World Class cocktail menu. If you get time you can even warm up for the Ryder Cup by practicing your putting skills whilst sipping on a Johnnie Walker Blue Label.

A World Class House

Diageo World Class House

From today until Sunday 3rd August, the industry’s most prestigious and respected mixology competition World Class, will open its doors to consumers for the very first time. For the whole week the World Class House will host a series of immersive, engaging and inspiring brand experiences in each room of the five story Georgian townhouse everyday from 5.30pm – 11.00pm.

Located at 33 Fitzroy Square the World Class House will act as the Central London hub, as the 49 most talented bartenders in the world compete to win the much-coveted accolade of World Class Global Champion.

This one-week luxury pop-up will delight and surprise guests with a host of bespoke drinking experiences, World Class cocktails and a selection of very special guests. It is available for £20 to those who register at http://www.definitivedrinkingguide.com/worldclassevents and includes you two tokens that can either be redeemed for two welcome cocktails or put towards one of the experiences – each experience will have a token value. Additional tokens can be bought
at the Hub in £5 denominations.

Comprising of five floors and a stunning rooftop terrace, the World Class House will have something for everyone, from the cocktail beginner to the most discerning drinker and will include the following experiences:

• The World Class Hub – a stylish bar and lounge at the heart of the World Class House, hosting lively seminars and the world’s best mixologists

• Alexander & James – discover the perfect mixologist-at-home package whilst learning about food and drink pairings with La Fromagerie and Allens of Mayfair. Join a cocktail master class and learn how to host the perfect party and pick up a bottle personally engraved with a message of your choice

Don Julio Visit Jalisco and La Cantina – discover a taste of Jalisco, Mexico via this underground secret bar fronting as a Latin American traditional travel agency. Can you find the vintage telephone that allows visitors access to the backroom?

• Johnnie Walker Blue Label Screening Room – exclusive screenings of Johnnie Walker Blue Label’s new short film staring Jude Law, called The Gentleman’s Wager

• Tanqueray No.TEN Martini Cocktail Bar – the glamour, style and
sophistication of the Art Deco movement is brought to life in the Tanqueray No.TEN martini cocktail bar, where ten unique martini cocktails have been created to pay homage to the ultimate classic cocktail

• Zacapa experience – fully immersive journey where guests will experience the story of Zacapa through all five senses followed by a tasting created by a renowned guest chef.

• Ketel One Sonic Tastings – Ketel One has worked closely with sensory experts to create a selection of scientifically-proven soundscapes and lighting effects that bring the liquid to life in a revolutionary way. What’s more also discover how to make the perfect Bloody Mary

As well as cocktail master-classes from some of the world’s most famous bartenders, debates featuring Michelin starred chefs and intimate tastings of premium whiskies such as, Johnnie Walker, Bulleit and Mortlach, the World Class House is not to be missed. Explore the World Class House this summer to discover incredible cocktails and a new world of spirits.

Follow the competition on Facebook at the World Class Facebook page at: http://www.facebook.com/worldclass

Winter Warmer Cocktails By Alexander & James

To ward off frosty winter nights, Alexander & James (A&J), the luxury online shopping platform for drinks connoisseurs and gift buyers brings you four classic winter cocktails to warm the heart and make the festive season merry.

A&J’s best mixologists recommend creating these fragrant winter warmers with the world’s finest spirits. The combination of luxury spirits, heavy creams and seasonal spices such as cinnamon, orange and nutmeg makes these four hearty beverages great companions for a cosy winter’s fire.

Eggnog
Eggnog

Eggnog

Eggnog is the ultimate festive cocktail. First invented in the 17th century this creamy ‘egg in a cup’ is today back in vogue and coming to a Christmas party near you.

Ingredients –

12 eggs, separated
1.5 L milk
500 ml thickened cream
1.5 cups sugar
700 ml bottle Zacapa 23
2 tsp ground nutmeg

Hot Tanqueray Cider

Hot Tanqueray Cider
Hot Tanqueray Cider

An evolution of the original Hot Toddy, the Hot Tanqueray takes a traditional luxury gin and gives its distinctly seasonal twist.

Ingredients – 

35 ml Tanqueray London Dry
15 ml fresh lemon juice
15 ml simple syrup
3 dashes bitters
3 dashes hot apple cider

Grand Spice Coffee

This classic combination of strong coffee with orange notes of Grand Marnier is heightened by the sweet taste of cinnamon and topped off with a decadent layer of cream.

Ingredients –

Grand Spice Coffee
Grand Spice Coffee

22.5 ml Grand Marnier Cordon Rouge
1 espresso
Whipped cream
Cinnamon powder
Ginger powder

 

http://www.alexanderandjames.com/

Tanqueray Tasting Notes

If i was to ask you “name me a gin made that is produced in Scotland”, most of you would be hard pressed to give me an answer. Some of you may mention Hendrick’s, or possibly some of the lesser seen brands like Edinburgh gin, Darnley’s View or Caorunn. But would you believe me if i said that Tanqueray is made in Scotland? To be fair, it never started out there, it was a bit further south in the Bloomsbury district of London, but Scotland would be making an appearance later in their esteemed history. First though a man named Charles Tanqueray set up shop in 1830, not knowing that his idea and indeed his name would revolutionise the gin category. Charles distilled unti his death in 1868 where Charles Waugh Tanqueray took over the business and merged with Gordon & Co. to form Tanqueray Gordon & Co. and moved all of its production to Gordon’s Goswell Road site. In 1937, Tanqueray released two relativly short-lived bottles – Tanqueray Orange gin and Tanqueray Lemon gin. Both would be phased out by 1957, but an idea that hasn’t is the now iconic green bottle.
Between 1948 and 1950, all production of Tanqueray was moved to be housed in the green glassed bottles, with 1977 proving its success by selling one million cases in the US alone. Due to the increase in demand, the distillery was moved to its Laindon site in Basildon, Essex. The first gin distillation using the traditional copper stills (including ‘Old Tom’ which was over 200 years old and survived an air raid in 1941 when the London distillery was almost completely destroyed but the one which housed ‘Old Tom’) was successfully achieved in 1989. The distillery moved again to Cameron Bridge in Scotland as its current owners, Diageo, created a ‘dual-purpose’ site for its brands. Tanqueray No. 10 was launched in the US in 2000 and notched up seven top awards in its first 8 months of availability including double gold at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition. In 2003 it was inducted into the World Spirits Hall of Fame.

Tanqueray No. 10

Not bad eh?

So what makes the Tanqueray brand different from all the others? Tanqueray is distilled four times and uses only 4 botanicals – juniper, coriander, angelica and liquorice. Compared to the number of botanicals in Bombay Sapphire, Sipsmith and Martin Millers which each have 10, it can make you wonder if more is necessarily better. Tanqueray No. 10 on the other hand has a little more attention to detail. Created for the Martini drinker, it’s named after the 10th still, with added fresh grapefruit, chamomile, lime and orange to the original 4 and infused in small batches. So what does this create? Well below i give to you my tasting notes –

Tanqueray London Dry – 43.1%

Very fresh and smooth on the nose with slight hints of juniper and citrus coming through. A good hit of liquorice is present on the palate, with a slight spice that creates a long tingle.

Tanqueray No. 10 – 47.3%

Very subtle yet fresh aromas of grapefruit on the nose which leads to a great blend of juniper, vanilla and lime on the palate. Sightly sweet that creates a long lasting flavour and a hint of spice at the end.

For something that’s regarded so highly, can you afford to mix it with other ingredients? Try some of these out –

Tanqueray – Tiny Ten

Tiny Ten

Glass

Martini

Ingredients –

75ml Tanqueray No. 10
25ml Sugar syrup
Quarter fresh grapefruit juice

Method –

Shake over ice and serve

French 75

Glass

Coupet

Ingredients –

25ml Tanqueray London Dry
Half a lemon
12.5ml Sugar syrup
100ml Champagne

Method –

Shake the Tanqueray, squeezed lemon and sugar syrup together over ice, strain into a coupet glass and top with Champagne.

Again, simple recipes can sometimes have the best outcomes. I think Mr Charles Tanqueray knew something we didn’t.

Check out the rest of the photos, taken at Canvas Lounge, via my Facebook page.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.