Distillnation Range Tasting Notes

There are many independent spirit specialists out their, but when it comes to fine spirits, the more exquisite brands, Distillnation can make the top spot. With brands including Ron Botran, De Luze Cognac and Artemisia Absinthe it covers categories that others shy away from and happily opens them out to the consumer eye.

Distillnation itself was founded by Francis Weier. A man with over 16 years of working in wines and spirits and one hell of a passion to boot, he founded Distillnation to expand the opportunities of premium spirits in the UK market. Bringing in team members including Maya who has under her belt many years both in business marketing and project management, has given Distillnation the edge with its creative and inspiring point of view of the premium spirits industry.

The brands that I have been lucky enough to try from the Distillnation portfolio are all below, and ive included both tasting notes and a brief description of the brand itself –

Absinthe

La Clandestine is a 100% natural, hand-crafted absinthe distilled using a 1935 recipe. Known as the classic Swiss bleue, it prides itself on its regionality and terroir that is unique to absinthe from the Val-de-Travers district. Officially launched to mark the Swiss legalisation of absinthe on 1st March 2005, it has won many an award including first prize and title of ‘Absinthe d’or’ at the National Competition for Swiss Spirits.

La Clandestine

La Clandestine – 53%

Strong on the nose with aromas of liquorice and herbs dominating. A rather sweet start on the palate though with a heavy dose of liquorice and a kick of spice near the end. It does mellow soon after.

Artemisia Absinthe Butterfly Boston 1902 is, as you can probably work out, an absinthe that was first distilled in Boston back in 1902 but re-produced in Couvet, Switzerland in 2010. Using the original recipe from the American group P. Dempsey and Company, a collaboration between the owner of America’s number one absinthe accessories store Absinthe Devil and Artemisia – the owner of La Clandestine (above) and Angélique absinthes, a Boston resident and owner of Absinthe Devil delve into the history of the Dempsey family and unearthed the recipe and sought to bring it back to the market.

Artemisia Absinthe Butterfly Boston 1902 – 65%

Clean on the nose but packs a powerful punch of herbs and wormwood. Very bold and with an instant warming on the palate with again lots of herbal flavours. Rather short overall but does create a long tingle on the tip of the tongue.

Artemisia Absinthe Angeique – 68%

Launched in 2007 and named after the daughter of creator Claude-Alain Bugnon, a rather subtle aroma of liquorice on the nose with herbs and angelique following. Rather light on the palate, with a water-like texture. Lots of aniseed flavours develop with a long, hot spice to the finish.

Rum

Ron Botran hails from the plantations in Retalhuleu in the south of Guatemala. The quality of the volcanic and clay soils that are permanently bathed by the sun are the perfect origins to grow sugar cane that is needed for the production of rum. Ron Botran is rather unique compared to other rums in that the rum industry in Guatemala was created specifically to produce distilled spirits and have been made out of virgin honey or brown sugar ever since.
To achieve the distinctive character of each one of its rums, they distill its rums individually differently for each product. Botran rums are distilled in stills with copper components that improve the quality of the rum and are then aged through the Solera System. Botran reaches adulthood in Quetzaltenango, the city where their aging facilities are located. Among the many aging secrets that make their rums unique is the charring of some the barrels used in the Solera System.

Ron Botran Reserva Blanca – 40%

Clean, soft nose of vanilla, whilst the palate enjoyed an incredibly smooth offering of dried fruits, hints of wood and vanilla. A slight spice developed near the end of the tongue but it created a fresh, short finish.

Ron Botran Solera 1893 – 40%

A blend of rums between 5 and 18 years, creates a rather bold and rich essence of vanilla on the nose which carries over onto the palate, becoming sweeter. It mellows soon after and although a short offering, is rather smooth.

Ron Botran Reserva

Ron Botran Reserva – 40%

A bend of rums between 5 and 14 years, clean and fresh on the nose with a slight aroma of vanilla. A kick of cinnamon to begin on the palate, but mellows quickly with flavours of caramel and fudge.

Cognac

The De Luze cognac house has a uniquely interesting history, with the origins of the company in New York. Two brothers set off to find success in the New World in the early 19th century and centuries later, De Luze is still a successful business with 410 hectares of vineyards in the prime growing area of Cognac. Their philosophy is to create a natural cognac with an elegant and light taste and colour.

De Luze VSOP – 40%

Hit of spiced fruit creates a strong, rich aroma on the nose but becomes smooth on the palate with slight hints of spice and fruit. Develops a long warmth with a mouth-watering finish.

Distillnation also have a couple of brands that i’ve explored in more detail, including –

Genever

Boompjes Premium – 35%

Sharp on the nose with malt aromas coming through. A developed palate of grain and spice from the beginning, smooth but with a kick at the end of fresh juniper. Lingers.

Boompjes Old Dutch – 38%

Slight notes of sweet juniper on the nose, with a clean, light palate of malt and grain blending well. A little heat and spice on the dry, lingering finish.

Vodka

Oseven – 40%

Very clean and light on the nose, with a very subtle hint of grain. Light on the palate too, with a little sweetness and soft texture. Short, but effective.

Gin

Sylvius – 45%

Rich, fresh nose of lavender, lemon and coriander on the nose, with the citrus dicing through on the palate too. Sharp hits of cinnamon and star anise come through, with a mellow turn of the lemons and a rush of lavender finishing. Long.

Although not widely available in the North, London is your best venture to experience the Distillnation brands in bars such as Zetter Townhouse and Callooh Callay, but you can purchase them all online.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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19 Spiced Tasting Notes

It’s always interesting to see and hear about brands being developed for a specific market, but a category that sometimes gets overlooked compared to the demographic that say vodka or tequila go for, is rum, and in particular 19 Spiced Vanilla. Aimed at the students and young generation who are growing out of the alcoh-pop world and developing their tastes for something more sophisticated and to be frank, better, 19 Spiced Vanilla has enjoyed success since its launch back in May last year.

Hailing from Trinidad and blended and distilled by the world-renowned Fernandes Distillers, 19 Spiced has been promoting itself as ‘a taste of liquid sunshine – for good times, always’.  To fulfill this, 19 Spiced is created to be versatile not only to be enjoyed over ice, but as the base to cocktails like Mojito, Daiquiri and Mai Tai. Even your simple mixers of ginger beer or coke will be acceptable if ordering.

So how does 19 Spiced Vanilla go down? Well below I give to you my tasting notes –

19 Spiced Vanilla – 35%

Instant hit of rich vanilla on the nose with lots of sweet notes following onto the palate. Very smooth offering with a slight hint of toffee but still dominated by vanilla. Creates a long-lasting after-taste.

Found in Tiki bars all over the UK, including Manchester’s own Keko Moku, 19 Spiced is changing the way rum should be approached. Give it a go!

Check out Steven James’ take on the rum world here.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Pink Pigeon Tasting Notes

Theres some spirits in the world that take their name from various sources. Bacardi has the Catalan wine merchant Facundo Bacardí Massó, Tanqueray has Charles Tanqueray, Amarula is named after its primary ingredient and Pink Pigeon after a rare Mauritian bird. Theres a Pink Pigeon in the world I hear you cry? Yup, these endangered birds fly freely on the Isle of Mauritius and have inspired the name of this spiced rum where some of the worlds finest sugar cane is produced.
To carry on the trend of rarity, Pink Pigeon is also one of the very few rums in the world that is distilled 5 times compared to the usual 3, and is also produced in the oldest distillery in Mauritius, first founded in 1926. Pink Pigeon also uses the second most expensive spice in the world, natural Bourbon Vanilla from Madagascar and Reunion Islands, that is blended for six months by Master Blender Alain Chatel. Launched in Mauritius in December 2010 and the rest of the world in February 2011 by the Indian Ocean Rum Company and Berry Bros. & Rudd Spirits, it has become a staple of the premium rum category as well as giving a vanilla twist to many a classic rum cocktail.

So with it standing out from other premium rums in both is production and name sake, how does it fare? Well below, I give to you my tasting notes –

Pink Pigeon – 40%

Instant soft vanilla hits the nose with smooth hints of exotic spice following. Both evolve slowly as it hits the palate with slight kicks of the spice around the edges as it gives an extremely long finish. Very balanced between the sweetness of the vanilla and hints of nutmeg.

Pink Pigeon is recommended to be served in the classics of Daiquiri’s or Mojito’s, or even slightly chilled, however to become more adventurous, ask your bartender to serve up one of these recipes –

Pink Pigeon Punch – serves 4

Glass

Jug

Ingredients –

200ml Ping Pigeon
2 Lemons
20ml Agave Nectar
200ml Watermelon juice
Ginger Beer top

Method –

Pour all ingredients into a jug and top with ginger beer.

Pink Pigeon Punch

Passionate Pigeon

Glass –

Highball

Ingredients –

50ml Pink Pigeon
50ml Lychee Juice
1/2 Pressed Lime
1 Passion Fruit
Ginger Beer

Method –

Shake all the ingredients together and top with ginger beer

Some great recipe ideas from this already award-winning rum, winning a gold medal for ‘Best Packaging’ at Harpers’ Wine and Spirit Design Awards 2011 and a bronze medal at this year’s ‘International Cocktail Challenge’. So if your after something a little different, rather unique (As part of the conservation effort, Pink Pigeon Rum
is a contributor to the Mauritian Wildlife Foundation) and to be fair doesn’t break the bank either, it’s the perfect addition to not only your own collection, but to a drink in your favourite bar.

Special thanks to The Circle Bar 360 for the back drop of the bottle photos.

Check out Steven James’ take on the rum world here.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Elements 8 Tasting Notes

Elements 8

The spiced rum category has always been dominated by the likes of Sailor Jerry and Morgan’s Spiced, but recently its been added to with Bacardi Oakheart, Kraken and Lambs Spiced all making their case to be the number one. But a major player has come into the reckoning – Elements 8. This unique brand has a three strong range of super premium rums as a result of eight individual elements that add distinct characteristics to each blend. It is also distilled and aged in the oldest distillery in St. Lucia with over 120 years of rum making experience. But what are these eight elements that make this brand stand out?

1. Terroir – The Windward island of St. Lucia with its tropical climate and volcanic formations provides the ideal conditions to transform cane into rum.

2. Cane – After primary selection of premium grade cane, it is ripened to perfection, harvested and milled to extract the rich and sweet molasses.

3. Water – Virgin rainforest provide a natural source of pure and pristine tropical water.

4. Fermentation – Three unique strains of yeast are combined with the molasses and purified water, each yeast strain imparting their own complex flavour characteristics.

5. Distillation – Four stills, including an innovative Kentucky Bourbon Vendome Pot Still, impart complexity and flavour. Only the ‘heart’ of the distillate is ever used.

6. Tropical Aging – Aged in #1 select, lightly charred American oak bourbon barrels. A tropical aged rum shares the characteristics of one aged for at least twice as long in a cooler climate.

7. Blending – The Master Blender expertly combines over ten hand-selected single rums.

8. Filtration – A light filtration process is applied to remove any residual impurities, naturally enhancing the purity and maintaining flavour.

What I have been lucky enough to try is their Elements 8 ‘barrel infused’ rum. This spiced rum is a complex hand blend of pot and column still rums, that have been infused with 10 fruits and spices added to the Bourbon barrel during the tropical ageing process that lasts for two years. The 10 herbs and spices (cinnamon, clove, nutmeg, ginger, star anise, vanilla, lemon, orange, coconut and honey) are macerated in the aged rum barrel for 2 weeks. As the spices soak in the rum their flavour is naturally infused and extracted. This process is akin to different barrel finishes seen in the whisky world where blends are finished in sherry, port and Madeira casks for example.

So with an ageing process of two years, how does Elements 8 Spiced fair? Well below I give to you my tasting notes –

Elements 8 Spiced – 40%

Lots of light floral spices on the nose with a slight hit of vanilla and aniseed type flavours mixing in near the end. Rather light on the palate, with a good burst of spice to begin with. A rather long flavour of cinnamon spice and vanilla, with a soft warming sensation to finish.

And how about the rest of the range? –

Elements 8 Gold – 40%

Very floral and smooth on the nose with hints of vanilla and a little spice near the end. Again rather smooth on the palate with no expected kick on the back of the throat. Quite sweet with a dry nut flavour coming through. Long.

Elements 8 Platinum – 40%

Soft, fresh nose with subtle citrus aromas coming through. Dry fruit flavours on the palate with a sharp vanilla and banana mix following. Mellows near the end for a lingering finish that is slightly dry.

Elements 8 Cacao – 40%

Launched in 2013, this is infused with criolo cacao beans. Heavily toasted wood and cocoa bean on the nose with a sweet scent of dark chocolate coming through. Bold flavours of roasted cocoa with lingering smoke and malt dark chocolate on the palate. Smooth with a long finish. Almost as if you’re eating chocolate.

So a fantastic Gold rum, a sipping Platinum to rival some of the best, a unique and surprising Cacao and Spiced that could give the others a run for its money. Especially with a cocktail like this –

Elements Eight – Dark and Spicy

Dark and Spicy

Glass –

Highball

Ingredients –

50 ml Elements 8 Spiced
20 ml Fresh lime juice
10 ml Sugar syrup
5 Mint leaves
Top with ginger beer

Method –

Build all ingredients, except ginger beer, over crushed ice and churn. Top with crushed ice and ginger beer. Garnish with mint, cinnamon stick and lemon wedge.

Creator Carl Stephenson is onto a winner here, with Elements 8 Spiced popping up on back bars all over the country alongside its Platinum, Gold and newbie Cacao. It’s also been winning awards too, with the spiced picking up the highest score and voted ‘best tasting spiced rum’ in the UK market by Imbibe in 2010. Its long slender square bottle is an eye catcher, as is the spirit inside, and well worth a try if you fancy something smooth to drink.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Rum Fire Tasting Notes

Theres a new overproof rum to excite and tantalize the drinking world, Rum Fire! Created and produced by the guys at Hampden Estate, a company that dates back to 1753, it’s back heeling the likes of Wray and Nephew to become a dominant force in the overproof category.

But what makes Rum Fire unique from its competitors?

Hampden Estate is famous for its high ester rums which provide bold flavours that Jamaica is famous for. They also specialise in using pot distillation over the more commonly used continuous distillation (their use of pot distillation produces many more flavours than a column still can).

Rum Fire itself was the brain child of the new owners of Hampden Estate who wanted to carry on the tradition of making heavy pot still rums, but wanted to hit the markets straight away. The answer was to go for something that doesn’t need to be aged – white overproof rum.  First bottled back in March 2011, Rum Fire has been making waves in its short life, being nominated at the Berlin Rum Festival in the category of ‘Best Overproof Rum’ and also receiving a nomination at the UK RumFest for the Golden Barrel Award for ‘Best New White Rum’. This year, Rum Fire won a Silver Medal in San Francisco for the Ministry of Rum competition.

So how does this already award-winning rum fare? Well below I give to you my tasting notes –

Rum Fire – 63%

Lots of nut and vanilla aromas on the nose with a strong citrus blast near the end. As expected, a strong hit of pepper and spice greets the palate first, but mellows quickly into a smooth, sweet yet short finish.

Rum Fire don’t recommend to drink its spirit neat, but instead to mix with ingredients to really enjoy its full flavour. Heres the best out of the bunch –

Rum Fire – Reggae Rum Puch

Reggae Rum Punch (1)

Glass –

Hurricane

Ingredients –

50 ml Rum Fire
50 ml Fresh Pineapple juice
50 ml Fresh orange juice
25 ml Fresh lime juice
12.5 ml Grenadine

Method –

Shake with plenty of ice and serve in a Hurricane glass. Garnish with a pineapple slice.

Although not everyones first choice of tipple when it comes to selecting a spirit to drink, overproof rum is a surprisingly good contribution to cocktails, and gives it that kick that you sometimes need to spice up your drink. Give it a go!

Check out the rest of the photos, taken at The Circle 360, via my Facebook page.

(1) Cocktail creation credited to Ian Burrell. I myself have changed the brand base ingredient.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Atlantico Rum Tasting Notes

Lately I’ve been fortunate enough to try out a relatively unheard of rum brand in the UK. Hailing from the Dominican Republic and endorsed by such stars as Enrique Inglesias and backing its own charity, Atlantico is sure to create some waves in the rum world.

But what makes Atlantico different from every other brand?

Atlantico is a blend of molasses based rums (heavier style) and fresh cane juiced rums (lighter style). The molasses gives the rum a lot more body and richness, whilst the cane juice gives lighter, more delicate tones. It’s aging process however is unique in the rum production world. The molasses and cane juice rums are aged separately for 2-3 years but are then blended together for a further 2 years. Once finished, it is placed into a solera aging system for up to 15 years. For a proper solera aging process, barrels of rum of different ages are stacked on top of each other, the oldest on the bottom, and the youngest on the top. When it is time to bottle, only a small percentage of the bottom (the oldest) barrels’ volume will be used. The empty space created by this drawing-off will be filled with rum from the level above, and those barrels will be filled with the level above them, and onwards and upwards, while the barrels on the top-level will be topped up with new rum.

Atlantico Rum

Before bottling, a small amount of Aguardiente (commonly known as fire water, it is rum distilled at a lower abv so it retains more of the characteristics) is added to the blend to give it a unique tasting profile. Once bottled, the founders personally inspect, hand number and initial each bottle before shipping. Not bad, especially as the whole process from start to finish is done by hand.

So after a Dominican journey, how does it all fair? Well below I give to you my tasting notes.

Atlantico Platino – 40%

Clean and light on the nose, with a slight sweetness roaming around. Very smooth on the palate with light vanilla flavours coming through, and hints of citrus near the end.

Atlantico Reserva – 40%

Bold vanilla aromas on the nose with a light sweetness mixing well onto the palate. Very light with lots of vanilla and oak dancing to a long finish.

Atlantico Private Cask – 40%

Light notes of vanilla and wood hit the nose and palate and transforms into an incredibly smooth offering. Bold, ripe, sweet vanilla flavours evolve near the end of this very long tot.

Some fantastic offerings from the Dominican Republic, and the cocktails are not too bad either. Ask your bartender to create you one of these –

Red Ocean

Red Ocean

Glass –

Rocks

Ingredients –

50ml Atlantico Rum
35ml Lime & Simple Syrup
10 Mint Leaves
5 Fresh Raspberries

Method –

In a cup muddle raspberries & mint leaves. Add Atlantico Rum & lime with simple syrup. Shake and serve over ice.

At the moment, Atlantico is only available online or in Selfridges, but expect to see it a lot more on the back bars of your favourite bars. Atlantico is coming, enjoy it when it does!

Check out the rest of the photos, taken at The Circle 360, via my Facebook page.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

The Liquorists Return of the Rum Trail

Last night was the first installment of the year in The Liquorists busy calendar, the aptly named ‘Return of the Rum Trail!’. Following the same concept of their previous trails, we were to be enjoying 5 different spirits, 5 different cocktails in 5 different bars accompanied by 5 different light bite appetizers. Always a daunting prospect, but challenge accepted!

Spiced Mojito at The Liars Club

Starting the night in Manchester’s Northern Quarter tiki bar, Keko Moku, we were joined by Barry, of Epernay fame, who would be our host for the evening. With around 15 of us for what The Liquorists call ‘more a gathering than a crowd’, Barry introduced to us the concept of rum, a little history and what this sugar cane drink we had in our hands was all about. No sooner had we nosed and tasted the tot of Bacardi 8yr and a piece of dark chocolate, which for me softened the edges a lil, Barry was handing out the rum classic Daiquiri complete with sugar rim. No sooner had we finished, we were hopping around the corner to our next venue, Hula Bar.

Mai Tai at Hula Bar

Appleton VX was the choice of spirit, and making our way to their underground haven via a wall tank of fish, we were greeted with both a tot of Appleton, and caramalised pineapple chunks. Whilst taking in the surroundings of what literally is a beach hut, another classic rum cocktail in the Mai Tai was being handed round as Barry explained the history of Appleton to the gathering.

Mojo’s was the next port of call, with their Rhum Room, a stunning upstairs bar with a backbar to die for, offering us the Venezuelan Santa Teresa rum to sip while their Venezuelan rum punch were being hand crafted for our pleasure. The rather long and refreshing cocktail was complimented well with dried figs, mango and pistachios.
 
Venezuelan Rum Punch at Mojo Rhum Room

From Venezuela back to Cuba, Bacardi and their spiced offering of the newly released Oakheart was next to showcase itself at The Liars Club, with an offering of a spiced Mojito being served while we munched on caramalised ginger pieces. All that was missing was the Hawaiin shirts! (still regretting not wearing my rather stylish bright yellow shirt, but there’s always next time).

Our last bar for the night was in one of Manchester’s tapas bars Sandinista. The Cuban Havana 3yr was sipped, while Espresso Martini cocktails were brought over to us amid stuffed peppers with cheese, platters of nachos with melted cheese, patatas bravas, olives, garlic bread and albondigas (meatballs).
A great night was had, with a round of applause given to Barry by all in attendance. And it truly was. Three friends joined me last night, one a veteran of the last two trails, just to experience something that I keep talking about long after.
 
With a busy year ahead for The Liquorists, you can expect to be hearing a lot more from me regarding this fantastic concept!
 
Check out The Liquorist’s Facebook page for more information and tickets.
 
 

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

24 Days of Christmas Cocktails – Day 17

Day 17 is another cocktail to warm the cockles using the relatively new Kraken Spiced Rum.

 

The Kraken Cider

Day 17 – The Kraken Cider – Kraken

Glass – 

Heat-proof  glass mug

Ingredients –

50ml Kraken Spiced Rum
125ml Hot Apple Cider

Method –

Build all ingredients into a heat-proof glass.

Garnish with cinnamon stick.

Each day for the next 7 days their will be a different christmas cocktail added to the site, so sign yourself up to be the first to find out! Make sure you follow me on Twitter (and the hash tag #24daysofchristmascocktails) or Facebook for instant updates.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

24 Days of Christmas Cocktails – Day 4

4 days in and it’s time for a twist on the classic Daiquiri using Havana 7yr.

Rome Daiquiri

Day 4 – Rome Daiquiri – Havana

Glass –

Daiquiri glass

Ingredients –

50 ml of Havana Club Añejo 7 Años
2 spoons of sugar
5 ml of lime juice
2 drops of Marrasquino
3 spoons of Nutella
1 slice of banana
 
Method –

Pour all the ingredients into a blender. Add crushed ice. Blend for 3 seconds. Pour into a daiquiri glass. 

 

Each day for the next 21 days their will be a different christmas cocktail added to the site, so sign yourself up to be the first to find out! Make sure you follow me on Twitter (and the hash tag #24daysofchristmascocktails) or Facebook for instant updates.

 

For the Havana site, click here to be directed to the links page

 

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2011. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

10 Cane Rum Tasting Notes

Hailing from Trinidad & Tobago, 10 Cane Rum is produced by Moët Hennessy (also the producers of Veuve Clicquot, Belvedere and Moët & Chandon) and is a relatively young product, being available to the public from 2005 and considered the first in-house developed brand by Moët Hennessy (instead of being traditionally aquired). Although not steeped in history like other rums, 10 Cane has been creating quite a stir, winning a range of awards at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition including one double gold, two gold, and two silver medals and faring well in international spirit ratings.

10 Cane Rum

The real question though that is on most consumers minds is why is it called 10 Cane?

Well traditionally, sugar cane stalks are harvested in bundles of 10. Additionally, it takes 10 sugar cane stalks to make one bottle of 10 Cane Rum. Simple! 10 Cane also uses first press cane juice which is the purest, most flavorful juice extracted from hand-harvested Trinidadian sugar cane. After the cane is hand-harvested, it is taken to the nearby distillery where it is gently pressed. The sugar cane juice is then fermented for 5 days in stainless steel tanks to allow for slow development of the aromas. The fermented sugar cane juice is then distilled twice in small batches in French pot stills ensuring optimal yet gentle extraction of the sugar cane aromas. Aged for one year in vintage French oak barrels, the sugar distillate is blended with a touch of extra old Trinidadian rum, which is to add complexity and versatility.

10 Cane – 40%

On the nose, 10 Cane releases hints of fresh floral aromas with a small hint of pear. The palate emphasises the presence of the pear and mixes well with vanilla and spice. It’s smooth as it makes its way around your mouth and gives off a soft kick in the after-taste of citrus flavours.

Theres also a fair few cocktails out their which utilises this light rum –

Flamingo

Glass –

Martini

Ingredients –

50ml 10 Cane
35ml Pineapple juice
10ml fresh lime juice
10ml Grenadine

Method –

Shake all the ingredients together and strain into a chilled Martini glass.

10 Cane – Tropical Storm

Tropical Storm

Glass –

Margarita

Ingredients –

25ml 10 Cane
25ml Banana liqueur
50ml Orange juice
Splash of Pineapple juice
Splash of Grenadine
1/2 Banana

Method –

Blend and serve in a margarita glass. Garnish with a slice of orange.

Two great ideas to ask your bartender for, or even create at home!

Check out the rest of the photos, taken at The Circle 360, via my Facebook page.

© David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog/sites author and owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to David Marsland and Drinks Enthusiast with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.